Oryx and Crake

paperback, 416 pages

Published July 28, 2009 by Vintage Canada.

ISBN:
9780307398482

View on OpenLibrary

4 stars (22 reviews)

Oryx and Crake is at once an unforgettable love story and a compelling vision of the future. Snowman, known as Jimmy before mankind was overwhelmed by a plague, is struggling to survive in a world where he may be the last human, and mourning the loss of his best friend, Crake, and the beautiful and elusive Oryx whom they both loved. In search of answers, Snowman embarks on a journey–with the help of the green-eyed Children of Crake–through the lush wilderness that was so recently a great city, until powerful corporations took mankind on an uncontrolled genetic engineering ride. Margaret Atwood projects us into a near future that is both all too familiar and beyond our imagining.

31 editions

aaahhh I love this book

5 stars

MA has hitched her wagon to a bunch of problematic shit in recent days but this book fucking rules. It had a huge influence on me as a teen and just rocked my socks as I listened to the killer audiobook performance by Campbell Scott. Excited to discuss with the book club next week. Corknut!

Review of 'Oryx and Crake' on Goodreads

2 stars

After an apocalyptic disaster, Snowman is the sole caretaker of a group of Crakers--a simple-minded, genetically-engineered people. But his past haunts him, and he relives the events leading up to the world-altering disaster.



It's hard for me to write anything about this novel without comparing it to Atwood's brilliant "Blind Assassin". The structure is very similar: an important event happened in the past, and the narrator slowly reveals the past while continuing on their life in their present. It's a tactic that worked well in "The Blind Assassin" because the narrator is a grandmother that I'm sure every reader could relate to. However, in "Oryx and Crake", the narrator is a crusty, disgruntled, semi-isolated man who is about as unappealing and uninteresting as a character can get. With "The Blind Assassin", the past event is a death, and we are intrigued right from the beginning because of the human connection, …

Review of 'Oryx and Crake' on 'Goodreads'

3 stars

Rant Alert



Overall, this was a very good book. I personally have little or no faith in the writing abilities of Margret Atwood, as I had read many of her short stories and poems in school. This book, however, was strongly suggested to me, and loving books as much as I do, I decided to give it a chance. For the most part I was surprised. I greatly enjoyed it, once I got into it (as it has a slightly slow start).



In the end, though, I feel greatly betrayed: I read nearly 400 pages, and even started to change my mind about Atwood's writing abilities, only to come to the final page to find... nothing. THere is no ending! The book does not end! This might appeal to some people... some people might not MIND inferring the ending of a 400 page story that they took time out of …

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