The Omnivore's Dilemma

A Natural History of Four Meals (Thorndike Press large print nonfiction)

Hardcover, 711 pages

English language

Published Nov. 8, 2006 by Thorndike Press.

ISBN:
9780786289523
OCLC Number:
70158447

View on OpenLibrary

5 stars (8 reviews)

In this groundbreaking book, one of America's most fascinating writers turns his mind to this seemingly straightforward question. The question has confronted us since man discovered fire, but, according to Pollan, how we answer it today may well determine our very survival as a species. To find out, Pollan follows each of the food chains that sustain us -- industrial food, organic or alternative food, and food we forage ourselves -- from the source to the final meal, and in the process develops a definitive account of the American way of eating. --back cover

7 editions

Review of "The Omnivore's Dilemma" on Goodreads

4 stars

1) "You would think that competition among individuals would threaten the tranquillity of such a crowded metropolis, yet the modern field of corn forms a most orderly mob. This is because every plant in it, being an F-1 hybrid, is genetically identical to every other. Since no individual plant has inherited any competitive edge over any other, precious resources like sunlight, water, and soil nutrients are shared equitably. There are no alpha corn plants to hog the light or fertilizer. The true socialist utopia turns out to be a field of F-1 hybrid plants."2) "I was curious to know what feedlot beef would taste like now, if I could taste the corn or even, since taste is as much a matter of what's in the head as it is about molecules dancing on the tongue, some hint of the petroleum. 'You are what you eat' is a truism hard to …

Review of "The Omnivore's Dilemma" on 'GoodReads'

5 stars

I was loaned this by my friend, Jasmine, who thought I'd enjoy it/should read it and I have to say that her prediction was spot-on. If you've ever wonder about the state of our industrial food system today (what's wrong with Agribusiness, mass distribution of heavily-processed food, the apparent necessity of such a system given our ever-expanding national and world population, how we got to this point), this is the book to read. Pollan covers everything from the co-evolution of corn and modern agricultural practices to the conditions of large feedlot operations to "grass farmers" to the benefits and limitations of foraging and hunting to the definition of "organic" in our present-day food economy.This book is a sweeping tour de force that encompasses a LOT in its 300 or so pages. Some have accused Pollan of misrepresenting possible "solutions" to problems he addresses here, but I think he does a …
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Subjects

  • Food habits
  • Food preferences
  • Large type books