Schulden

Die ersten 5000 Jahre

Paperback, 536 pages

German language

Published March 21, 2012 by Klett-Cotta.

ISBN:
9783608947670
OCLC Number:
772967197

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4 stars (16 reviews)

Ein ebenso radikaler wie befreiender Blick auf die Wurzeln unserer Schuldenkrise

Seit der Erfindung des Kredits vor 5000 Jahren treibt das Versprechen auf Rückzahlung Menschen in die Sklaverei. Die Geschichte der Menschheit erzählt David Graeber als eine Geschichte der Schulden: eines moralischen Prinzips, das nur die Macht der Herrschenden stützt. Damit durchbricht er die Logik des Kapitalismus und befreit unser Denken vom Primat der Ökonomie.

Ein radikales Buch im doppelten Wortsinn, denn Graeber packt das Problem der Schulden an der Wurzel, indem er bis zu ihren Anfängen in der Geschichte zurückgeht. Das führt ihn mitten hinein in die Krisenherde unserer Zeit: Von der Antike bis in die Gegenwart sind revolutionäre Bewegungen immer in Schuldenkrisen entstanden.

Graeber sprengt die moralischen Fesseln, die uns auf das Prinzip der Schulden verpflichten. Denn diese Moral ist eine Waffe in der Hand der Mächtigen. Die weltweite Schuldenwirtschaft ist eine Bankrotterklärung der Ökonomie. Der Autor enttarnt …

20 editions

Violence ends in Debt

5 stars

David Graeber is a master of taking a familiar idea, then leaving it precisely where it is, and moving you as a reader around it to see it from unexpected angles. In Debt he does this masterfully. Beginning with a critique of the moralistic perspective of debt ("one should pay one's debts"), followed with a sharp denial of a common claim by most modern economists (that barter preceded money), Graeber lays into five thousand years of economic history via meticulous research and his own brand of coy, enjoyable writing.

From an anthropological analysis of contemporary societies to a historical analysis that thankfully takes in European and non-European views, the book is appreciably ambitious. It seamlessly links debt and contemporary economics to war, plunder and violence, something that has been long discussed but rarely so eloquently. It is also not without its flaws or a few broad claims, but Graeber's way …

Review of 'Debt' on 'GoodReads'

3 stars

Debt is an anthropologist's take on the history of money, debt, and political economy. The book is largely an attack on many of the assumptions mainstream economists make about human nature and human history. Foremost among those false assumptions is what Graeber calls the Myth of Barter - the idea that prior to money, trade happened only through barter. Graeber, like others before him, points out that a society or economy organized around barter has never existed. Instead, the earliest human societies organized trade around centralized communal distribution or (much more commonly) credits and debts, often elaborately measured and recorded.



Graeber then re-tells 5,000 years of economic history, arguing that history can be seen as a cycle between debt-based and money-based societies. He explains that the first money-based societies were largely an outgrowth of imperialism, war finance, and slavery. The general idea is that imperial states began to raise professional …

Review of 'Debt: The First 5,000 Years' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

A thoughtful dive into the history of currency, what we all owe each other, and the philosophies of equality and merit we take for granted underpinning everything. Ultimately, Graeber critiques capitalism without suggesting any quick fixes.



He ascribes a considerable amount of intentionality and architecting to our current system, and his historical storytelling sometimes invisibly transitions into factually unsubstantiated musing, but his ideas are gristle for thought, and good leads into more reading on the philosophy of value.

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