How to Be an Antiracist

How to Be an Antiracist (2019, Penguin Random House)

240 pages

English language

Published July 12, 2019 by Penguin Random House.

ISBN:
9781847926005

View on OpenLibrary

4 stars (11 reviews)

Ibram X. Kendi's concept of antiracism reenergizes and reshapes the conversation about racial justice in America--but even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. In How to be an Antiracist, Kendi asks us to think about what an antiracist society might look like, and how we can play an active role in building it.

In this book, Kendi weaves together an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science, bringing it all together with an engaging personal narrative of his own awakening to antiracism. How to Be an Antiracist is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond an awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a truly just and equitable society.

5 editions

Less a “how to” than a “what is”

4 stars

The author presents a steady, clear, additive set of definitions and considerations of racism. These are braided with personal and historical stories that illustrate, place in context, and humanize the drier, sober definitions that mark each new set.

When I began, it seemed straightforward, but as it built, as more was folded in, as the author stepped through things I had wondered or left unresolved in my own understanding, I felt more engaged.

Perhaps some punches pulled on the chapter on class? Perhaps the suddenness of the parallels with cancer not as compelling to me as, surely, it must be for the author and many others?

How to Be an Antiracist

3 stars

1) "What's the problem with being 'not racist'? It is a claim that signifies neutrality: 'I am not a racist, but neither am I aggressively against racism.' But there is no neutrality in the racism struggle. The opposite of 'racist' isn't 'not racist.' It is 'antiracist.' What's the difference? One endorses either the idea of a racial hierarchy as a racist, or racial equality as an antiracist. One either believes problems are rooted in groups of people, as a racist, or locates the roots of problems in power and policies, as an antiracist. One either allows racial inequities to persevere, as a racist, or confronts racial inequities, as an antiracist. There is no inbetween safe space of 'not racist.' The claim of 'not racist' neutrality is a mask for racism. This may seem harsh, but it's important at the outset that we apply one of the core principles of antiracism, …

avatar for sunstone

rated it

4 stars
avatar for SmokeAndAsh

rated it

5 stars
avatar for SmokeAndAsh

rated it

5 stars
avatar for SmokeAndAsh

rated it

5 stars
avatar for cubicgarden

rated it

5 stars
avatar for WiFlag

rated it

3 stars
avatar for alisonboden

rated it

4 stars
avatar for rosnovsky

rated it

5 stars