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Tomat0

Tomat0@bookwyrm.social

Joined 1 year, 6 months ago

I mostly read non-fiction books on academic subjects although I'll read a few other stuff here and there.

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The Epistle to the Romans (1933, Oxford university press, H. Milford) 5 stars

This volume provides a much-needed English translation of the sixth edition of what is considered …

In fear and trembling he learnt to respect God's justice. As Saul he had been dissolved; he was blinded; the course of his life was broken. Only then did he begin to love God; only then did he know Him as the Creator and Redeemer of men; only then did zeal for God begin to flare up within him. When the destructive holiness of God had become vividly real to him, the mercy of God embraced him in its power. When the relation to God became to him a relation of expectancy, he became one who possessed: he possessed peace and hastened with God. In his weakness and insignificance, God had directed His attention towards him, and had laid upon him the burden of an ever insistent divine employment. Pressed onwards irrevocably by the power of God, he became what he is—the messenger of Him before whom every man is dust and ashes. He is what he is not; he knows what he does not know; he does what he cannot do— / live, yet not I. This is the grace in which Paul stands. Since the message cannot be separated from the man who utters it, and since his exaltation is crossed by humiliation, Paul has nothing to say concerning the peace of God, nothing even concerning his own existence, which is not spoken in a paradox.

The Epistle to the Romans by 

The Epistle to the Romans (1933, Oxford university press, H. Milford) 5 stars

This volume provides a much-needed English translation of the sixth edition of what is considered …

We know that in daring to use such language, we are entering the twilight of religious romanticism, in which sin and grace, faith and unbelief, take concrete form and become things which some men "have" and others "are not". But we know the passage from death to life by the power of the resurrection, the freedom from sin and and the service to righteousness, may be assigned to no known person...

And yet we boldly employ this language, the language of romanticism, because it is impossible to describe the immediacy of divine forgiveness except by means of parables drawn from human immediacy. Owing to the infirmity of the flesh, since men's ears are inadequately tuned to the truth, any avoidance of such words as "existence" or "possession" necessarily obscures and weakens understanding of the reality of forgiveness. Men must not be permitted to remain spectators, otherwise they will be unable to apprehend the conversion which God effects.

The Epistle to the Romans by  (Page 220)