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annewalk

annewalk@bookwyrm.club

Joined 3 months, 3 weeks ago

Emerging fiction writer/poet of mixed heritage, Haudenosaunee (Cayuga) and Hungarian, living in Ontario, Canada. Published in Room Magazine, Vocamus Press, Humber Literary Review, Canadian Authors Association – Toronto. Love #writing, #art, #tech, and how they intersect. On Mastodon @annewalk@tootsweet.social

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The Centaur's Wife (Paperback, 2021, Random House Canada) 3 stars

Amanda Leduc's brilliant new novel, woven with fairy tales of her own devising and replete …

Showed promise but, ultimately, disappointing

3 stars

The concept was interesting from the start. I enjoyed the interweaving of two story genres - myth and apocalyptic disaster. The execution fell short for me, unfortunately, making it difficult to care about the characters or the story world.

The City We Became (Hardcover, 2020, Orbit) 4 stars

From three-time Hugo award-winning and New York Times bestselling author N. K. Jemisin, The City …

Superhero Story

4 stars

It took me a while to get into this story but I'm glad I stuck with it. If you like stories with a lot of battles between heroes and monster villains, this is your book. While I enjoy a superhero show as much as the next person, reading fight scenes in a novel is not to my taste. As the story unfolds, the social commentary ramps up. Would be especially relevant to New Yorkers who are familiar with personalities of the city's boroughs. As an outsider, I understood enough to see where the story was headed but I'm sure it offer more to New York inhabitants. I read this book via audiobook and enjoyed the voicing and dramatization.

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (Paperback, 2008, Penguin Books) 4 stars

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao is a 2007 novel written by Dominican American …

Strong Narrative Voice

3 stars

I liked the use of a strong narrative voice in this book, and that the story is narrated through the eyes of one of the side characters. The world inhabited by the characters is dangerous and difficult and I really got a sense of it. I did find the language (racism, misogyny, fatphobia, etc) difficult to deal with. I didn't like the protagonist, Oscar, a young man with Incel/stalker tendencies, and I had a hard time empathizing with him. This isn't always necessary in order to enjoy a novel but, in this case, I thought my ambivalence toward him lessened the effect of the conclusion. Overall, I'm glad to have read this story. I may go through it at a later date and read through the footnotes which I left out as they slowed the pace of the story.

When We Lost Our Heads (Hardcover, Harper Collins) 5 stars

Marie Antoine is the charismatic, spoiled daughter of a sugar baron. At age twelve, with …

A fun read with lively characters. I enjoyed the voice of the book, the short, snappy sentence structure, the witty language. An inordinate number of similes. Unbelievably so. Once I noticed, which was early into the novel, I couldn't un-notice. Wild imagery. Satisfying ending.

My Dark Vanessa (2020, Harper Audio) 4 stars

This was a difficult read. I listened to it in audiobook form which heightened the story as well as the tensions surrounding the themes (CW. This book is about sexual abuse and, in particular, grooming). I was, at times, angry with the author. For most of the book, it feels apologetic, minimizing, even encouraging. This is because we are in the mind of the fifteen year old girl who is experiencing the abuse. If we feel confused, it's because she feels confused. This type of close read of a complicated and complicating character can be difficult. It can even be seen as problematic. I thought it was inspired. I recognized this girl. This book will stick with me, always, in good ways and bad. (tip: Stay for the interviews at the end of the audiobook)

The Overstory (2019, W. W. Norton & Company) 5 stars

The Overstory, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, is a sweeping, impassioned work of …

This epic at the speed of trees taught me to pay attention to the journey. It took me nearly a month to read and was not time wasted. Profound, illuminating, reality shifting. I'll be chewing on it for years to come.

The stone gods (2007, Hamish Hamilton) 5 stars

This new world weighs a yatto-gram.

But everything is trial-size; tread-on-me-tiny or blurred-out-offocus huge. There …

Second Reading

5 stars

Wonderful. Winterson claims that the mind can't tell the difference between the past and future. Only now and not now. And the story goes round and round and round.