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joachim@lire.boitam.eu

Joined 9 months, 1 week ago

I mostly read SF&F. My 2021

Languages: fr, en.

DM me if you want to read books that I've read, I can lend most of them as ePubs.

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joachim@lire.boitam.eu's books

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The Lies of Locke Lamora (2007, Gollancz) 5 stars

An orphan’s life is harsh—and often short—in the mysterious island city of Camorr. But young …

Highly entertaining!

5 stars

These days, very few books keep me up until 2 at night. This one did it for me.

In a fantasy city inspired by Venice in the Renaissance, Locke Lamora is a thief. Not any common thief though, he's been brought up to be the BEST thief, along with his crew. He made me think of Arsène Lupin or Fantômas (minus the sadistic approach—which is taken by Lamora's enemies).

The action is fast-paced, the world is well made, but I regret that almost all major characters are men.

The Lies of Locke Lamora (2007, Gollancz)

The Lies of Locke Lamora by 

An orphan’s life is harsh—and often short—in the mysterious island city of Camorr. But young Locke Lamora dodges death and …

avatar for joachim@lire.boitam.eu joachim@lire.boitam.eu boosted
Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist (2017, Random House Business Books) 5 stars

Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist is a 2017 non-fiction book …

Eye Opening

5 stars

As someone who studiously avoided economics classes in college, I feel ill-equipped to consider, let alone judge, economic policies. I had the impression that economic growth was bad for our ecological stability l, but couldn't explain why. I loved Doughnut Economics because it covered economic history and concepts approachably, and gave alternative models for thinking about economics. From now on, I won't care about narratives of economic growth - I'll want to hear about how quality of life is improving and our biosphere is thriving.

@jiewawa@bookwyrm.social Good to know, thanks! I guess it's all due to the exposition: introducing all the characters, the whole world, and so on… and the end was much more solid than the start of the book, with all the different threads to follow. A friend of mine also started it, got discouraged at first but now he's hanging on to finish that first one. I'll wait a bit between all the books so I don't burn out, but I'll be sure to pick up the next one soon!