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polymerwitch Locked account

polymerwitch@bookwyrm.social

Joined 2 years, 7 months ago

I like speculative fiction and political philosophy

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polymerwitch's books

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Currently Reading

Rebecca Roanhorse: Black Sun (2020, Gallery / Saga Press) 4 stars

The first book in the Between Earth and Sky trilogy, inspired by the civilizations of …

Wonderful Fantasy

5 stars

First fantasy book I've enjoyed in years. The setting was so refreshing and new, but it also felt like a real place. Maybe it's a world I've visited in my dreams? It surely will be a world I dream visit in the future.

Rebecca Roanhorse: Black Sun (2020, Gallery / Saga Press) 4 stars

The first book in the Between Earth and Sky trilogy, inspired by the civilizations of …

I'm loving this book. The setting pulls from a such a rich cultural history that the world is very real. The people remind me of friends and acquaintances in real life with their unique outward expressions and patterns of reasoning. Not quite a third through this book, and I already feel like the characters are people I know in real life, and would love to talk to.

Margaret Killjoy: A Country of Ghosts (2014, Combustion Books) 4 stars

Dimos Horacki is a Borolian journalist and a cynical patriot, his muckraking days behind him. …

The book is very enjoyable. If you are interested in utopian anarchist fiction I would call it a must read. The framing of freedom in a setting of war isn't my favorite. I really like the idea of exploring struggles in supposed utopias, and I think experiencing Hron in peace time would have been more to my liking. That's personal preference though.

Susanna Clarke: Piranesi (Paperback, 2020, Bloomsbury Publishing) 4 stars

From the New York Times bestselling author of Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell, an …

A beautiful book that quiets and comforts my mind

5 stars

If we were born in another world what form would the shadows cast upon the walls of our cave take? What mythologies and art would inform our identity? What are the limits that malicious people have to do harm through warping and confining our realities? How does the society around me shape the person I am at any given time?

Piranesi explores these questions in a labyrinth of an endless house full of statues that is flooded by the sea. The answers are in the faces of our neighbors and in the hushing pose of the faun.