Lady of the Lake

Published Jan. 27, 1999 by superNOWA.

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4 stars (10 reviews)

1 edition

Review of 'Lady of the Lake' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

Though I'll be the first to admit that there were some painfully slow parts, when things started happening in this book, they happened hard and fast and the pace kept up for hundreds of pages. I do miss the lighthearted fun of the first story collections, but this is some really amazing storytelling.

Sapkowski managed to come up with a whole new set of clever circumstances and new ways to tell the story. When it's good, it's brilliant. I'm really torn between a 4 and 5 star rating, mostly because I felt like there were some loose ends that may never be addressed. Eh, screw it. Five stars. This is Book 7 by my reading order (which follows publication order).

My understanding is that Book 8: Season of Storms is a prequel of sorts. That sounds fun.

Review of 'Lady of the Lake' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

Lady of the Lake is the conclusion to the 5-part The Witcher series.

Ciri has teleported, and discovers she has some magical power, allowing her to travel between space and time. She tries to return to her own world, and succeeds.
Meanwhile, Geralt and his companions are still scouring the continent for Ciri, and get caught up in an affair of Dandelion in Toussaint, after being pursued by mercenaries hired by Vilgefortz.

Something I find quite impressive, and admirable, is Sapkowski's accurate style of descriptions. I can imagine myself, standing on the remains of a battlefield, with the crows pecking the corpses, and the survivors moaning for help.
The battle of Brenna is brilliantly described. No romanticizing, no glorification of death or violence, just pure, raw, and frankly unnecessary bloodshed. The battle is told from the the perspectives of poor scribe Jarre, who has found himself in a pike regiment, …

Review of 'Lady of the Lake' on 'Storygraph'

4 stars

The last book of The Witcher saga! I loved the first half of the book with its parallel universes and the fact that the story of The Witcher is viewed as a type of distant land fairy tale. One thing that this author can do is create complex characters, meaning, no one is ever lawful good, everybody is chaotic (neutral, good or evil). Themes like misogyny, slavery and racial discrimination are all present in the story.

We discover that there are elves and humans living in different dimensions but everybody is trapped in their own worlds, except for some with unique powers who can travel between timelines.
Everybody is looking for Ciri because of her extraordinary powers. Elves can be as evil as humans and sorceresses. And Ciri is on her own quest to escape what everybody think is her destiny.

I took a few days to grasp the ending, …

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4 stars
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5 stars
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5 stars