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Annie the Book

AnnieTheBook@bookwyrm.social

Joined 1 year, 4 months ago

Librarian, velocireader, word nerd.

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Annie the Book's books

To Read

Seth Dickinson: The Traitor Baru Cormorant (2016, Tor Books) 4 stars

Tomorrow, on the beach, Baru Cormorant will look up from the sand of her home …

The Traitor Baru Cormorant, by Seth Dickinson

3 stars

Baru Cormorant’s life changed forever when she was a small child. Her recollections of life with her hunter mother, shieldbearer father, and blacksmith father sound idyllic. Her mother taught her about the birds that lived on their island. Her fathers taught her about tradecraft and keeping her ears open. But when the Empire of Masks arrived with their paper money—and, later, their plagues and schools and “hygiene”—her childhood was obliterated. Years later, Baru Cormorant walks a fine line between obedience and treachery in Seth Dickinson’s powerful novel, The Traitor Baru Cormorant...

Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type.

Kaliane Bradley: Ministry of Time (2024, Simon & Schuster) 5 stars

In the near future, a civil servant is offered the salary of her dreams and …

The Ministry of Time, by Kaliane Bradley

5 stars

Time travel stories usually follow the exploits of someone rocketing through time to change history. This person ponders the various time travel paradoxes or wrestles with the implications of an ever-splitting multiverse. All of which is to say that Kaliane Bradley’s The Ministry of Time is a unique look at the perils of time travel. Instead of travelers deliberately injecting themselves into history, a mysterious British Agency has used a recovered time machine to “rescue” five Britons from the past from their inevitable deaths by pulling them into a future ravaged by climate change. Our narrator is one of the few civil servants in on the secret, selected to help acclimate one of the “expats” to life in the twenty-first century...

Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.

Doina Ruști: The Book of Perilous Dishes (Romanian language) 3 stars

1798: A magical, dark adventure. Fourteen-year-old Pâtca, initiated in the occult arts, comes to Bucharest, …

The Book of Perilous Dishes, by Doina Ruști

3 stars

Pâtca is on the run in Doina Ruști’s The Book of Perilous Dishes (carefully translated by James Christian Brown). She flees from her small village when her grandmother is accused of witchcraft. Unlike so many others accused like this, Pâtca and her family really are witches. Sadly, their knowledge is no match for a pissed-off mob and Pâtca must seek refuge in Bucharest, only to learn that this is just the first in a series of unfortunate events...

Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.

Lindsay Lynch: Do Tell (2023, Diversified Publishing, Random House Large Print) 3 stars

As character actress Edie O'Dare finishes the final year of her contract with FWM Studios, …

Do Tell, by Lindsay Lynch

3 stars

Before the studio system was broken up by the Supreme Court, film studios would sign actors up to multi-year contracts. Actors under contract would not only be told which films they would appear in but also told which parties to go to, when to go to rehab, and sometimes placed into fictional relationships. Show business wasn’t just what the audience saw on the screen. It continued in the newspapers and magazines and, perhaps especially, in the gossip columns. Edie O’Dare, the protagonist of Lindsay Lynch’s novel Do Tell, is rapidly approaching the end of her seven-year contract and is unlikely to see a renewal. In 1938, there weren’t many legitimate ways for an unconventional woman to make a living...

Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type.

reviewed The Brides of High Hill by Nghi Vo (The Singing Hills Cycle, #5)

Nghi Vo: The Brides of High Hill (Tor) 3 stars

The Cleric Chih accompanies a beautiful young bride to her wedding to an aging lord …

The Brides of High Hill, by Nghi Vo

3 stars

Cleric Chih returns in The Brides of High Hill, Nghi Vo’s fifth entry in the Singing Hills Cycle. Chih is once again on the road and collecting stories. This time, they have fallen in with a small family on their way to see their daughter married to the wealthy lord of Do Cao. This daughter has insisted that Chih follow along to keep her company. The daughter’s parents are less cheerful about their newest companion. Politeness keeps them from tossing Chih out on their ear. Before long, I daresay that Chih would have preferred to be tossed out on the road...

Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.

Eve J. Chung: Daughters of Shandong (2024, Penguin Publishing Group) 4 stars

Daughters are the Ang family’s curse.

In 1948, civil war ravages the Chinese countryside, but …

Daughters of Shandong, by Eve J. Chung

4 stars

Human rights lawyer Eve J. Chung draws inspiration from her family’s history to tell the story of Hai, one of the eponymous Daughters of Shandong. Hai is one of four sisters born to the wealthy Ang family. Although the family is privileged, Hai’s life—and the lives of her mother and sisters—is a miserable one of hard work and regular humiliation at the hands of their grandmother. Things get even worse when the Chinese Civil War rips through the country and the Angs abandon Hai, her mother, and her other sisters to keep an eye on the family home until “things blow over.” This novel is difficult to read as the female Angs face violence, hunger, illness, bureaucracy, and relentless sexism...

Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.

P. Djèlí Clark: The Dead Cat Tail Assassins (Hardcover, Tordotcom) 4 stars

The Dead Cat Tail Assassins are not cats.

Nor do they have tails.

But they …

The Dead Cat Tail Assassins, by P. Djèlí Clark

4 stars

There are very clear rules about being an assassin and Eveen the Eviscerator (it was one time, she says) follows them very carefully. After all, being an assassin is the only reason that she’s alive…well, not actually alive. She’s undead. In her first life, she made a promise to serve Aeril, the Matron of Assassins, for one hundred years. In P. Djèlí Clark’s beautifully plotted and highly entertaining novella, The Dead Cat Tail Assassins, we get to witness Eveen’s greatest caper...

Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.

Nick Medina: Indian Burial Ground (2024, Penguin Publishing Group) 4 stars

All Noemi Broussard wanted was a fresh start. With a new boyfriend who actually treats …

Indian Burial Ground, by Nick Medina

4 stars

Louie arrives at the (fictional) Takoda reservation in Louisiana, unwittingly just in time to help his niece Noemi after she suffers a personal tragedy. He’s been gone for years, only coming back for the annual powwow. It’s been ten years since his last visit as Indian Burial Ground, by Nick Medina, opens. Over the course of the novel, we’ll learn what pushed Louie away—and how Noemi came to be stuck in arrested development...

Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, for review consideration.