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Rupert Owen Locked account

RupertOwen@bookwyrm.social

Joined 1 year, 5 months ago

Orchardist, beekeeper, brewer of country wines and author.

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2022 Reading Goal

41% complete! Rupert Owen has read 5 of 12 books.

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My Stroke of Insight (2006, Lulu.com) 3 stars

Stroke of Insight ... insight.

2 stars

It is a very short read (183 pages all told), and summarises her severe stroke and eight year recovery. It’s a fairly fluffy account of stroke but the science is interesting. Jill is a very enthusiastic individual, with a unique perception of the brain. I can relate to this, but I am not as enthusiastic as her about life in general or spiritual matters. In fact, I found some of the overwhelming positivity to be counterintuitive to my own circumstances. I also believe that life is like a battery and requires both positive and negative to provide a life force energy. However, the fact that I didn’t feel a rapport with the writer didn’t prevent me from taking away some good ideas from her experience. I also am one who thinks that negative feelings and emotions are not only useful but for some are unavoidable due to circumstance, pain, and …

Entangled Life (2021, Random House Trade Paperbacks) 4 stars

When we think of fungi, we likely think of mushrooms. But mushrooms are only fruiting …

Entangled Writing

3 stars

On the whole, I found Merlin's book an okay read. I have listened to him talk on various podcasts, and it was interesting to visit the source of his thoughts. I feel it is a confession of a mycophilic, heavily spun from reference material, doctoral studies, and associates in the field. It was more like a thesis than a text on field research. But, and there is a big but, I can't fault Sheldrake's bringing all this material together in one text, peppered by his boyish enthusiasm. It is lovely to indulge in someone's own passion, regardless of how they present it.

Sometimes, I felt the adulation for psilocybin to be laboured and at times pontifical. I think if one is going to dip into social science, there might the other side of the coin mentioned when psilocybin has caused psychosis, or done nothing at all in the way of …

Dry stone walls of Britain range from the stone hedges of south-west England to the …

Dry Stone Walls

5 stars

Another brilliant Shire publication. A tidy introduction to dry stone walling. This guide is wonderful as it covers regional styles, and explains the process with brevity and clarity. I would recommend for anyone wishing to dip their toes in this craft.

Dry stone walls of Britain range from the stone hedges of south-west England to the …

Dry Stone Walls

5 stars

Another brilliant Shire publication. A tidy introduction to dry stone walling. This guide is wonderful as it covers regional styles, and explains the process with brevity and clarity. I would recommend for anyone wishing to dip their toes in this craft.

The traditional craft of stickmaking is "popular" in the truest sense—the necessary skills can be …

The Craft of Stickmaking

3 stars

It’s an interesting read, much of it focuses on designing and shaping the crook from various material. I would have enjoyed more on the lore of stick making, but from a practical viewpoint, this book is not bad. It covers most of what I already practice as a stick maker, but the detail on the individual crook making methods is interesting. A useful handbook to have at one's side.

This new edition of David Crystal's classic book is the definitive survey of English in …

Language including English

3 stars

David writes concisely about the English language and its global impact. For me, part three was the most interesting, but was fairly truncated in its overview, while other sections of the book felt a little frivolous. Some of the earlier sections, such as poetry and wordplay, are apropos to most languages, and it felt like surplus filler material to bulk out the book. Sometimes, there are tables included like the trucker CB-10 codes that take up a fair whack of page space, and feel completely unnecessary to the subject matter at hand. However, David has formatted this book to be approached as periodical minutiae without the need to read in sequence. In this way, it felt like a Sunday morning read, along with the crossword.