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Luka /bookwyrm/

luka@bookwyrm.social

Joined 2 years, 6 months ago

Slow reader. Computer music, sci-fi & critical theory.

luka.princic.studio

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Luka /bookwyrm/'s books

Currently Reading (View all 9)

2024 Reading Goal

8% complete! Luka /bookwyrm/ has read 1 of 12 books.

Paolo Bacigalupi: The Windup Girl (2009) 4 stars

The Windup Girl is a biopunk science fiction novel by American writer Paolo Bacigalupi. It …

She is an animal. Servile as a dog. And yet if he is careful to make no demands, to leave the air between them open, another version of the windup girl emerges. As precious and rare as a living bo tree. Her soul, emerging from within the strangling strands of her engineered DNA.

He wonders if she were a real person if he would feel more incensed at the abuse she suffers. It's an odd thing, being with a manufactured creature, built and trained to serve. She herself admits that her soul wars with itself. That she does not rightly know which parts of her are hers alone and which have been inbuilt genetically.

The Windup Girl by 

@nutsandbolts@kolektiva.social I boosted it with my sonomu account. you can follow bookwyrm accounts on mastodon. you then get the updates and quotes and reviews in your mastodon feed where you can star/fav them or boost them or reply. if my bookwyrm profile does not appear on your mastodon instance correctly (you get forwarded to bookyrm.social) you can search for @luka@bookwyrm.social (that is @ luka @ bookwyrm.socal) or url of my profile (bookwyrm.social/user/luka) in the search field.

Dan Simmons: The Fall of Hyperion (Paperback, 2004, Gollancz) 4 stars

On the world called Hyperion, beyond the law of the Hegemony of Man, there waits …

Do you forget that your homeworld was founded on a solemn covenant of life?” said Coredwell Minmun. The Consul turned toward the Ouster. “Such a covenant governs our lives and actions,” said Minmun. “Not merely to preserve a few species from Old Earth, but to find unity in diversity. To spread the seed of humankind to all worlds, diverse environments, while treating as sacred the diversity of life we find elsewhere.” Freeman Ghenga’s face was bright in the sun. “The Core offered unity in unwitting subservience,” she said softly. “Safety in stagnation. Where are the revolutions in human thought and culture and action since the Hegira?” “Terraformed into pale clones of Old Earth,” answered Coredwell Minmun. “Our new age of human expansion will terraform nothing. We will revel in hardships and welcome strangeness. We will not make the universe adapt … we shall adapt.”

The Fall of Hyperion by 

Dan Simmons: The Fall of Hyperion (Paperback, 2004, Gollancz) 4 stars

On the world called Hyperion, beyond the law of the Hegemony of Man, there waits …

All day and all night the pain of the universe floods in and wanders the fevered corridors of my mind as verse, imagery, images in verse, the intricate, endless dance of language, now as calming as a flute solo, now as shrill and strident and confusing as a dozen orchestras tuning up, but always verse, always poetry.

The Fall of Hyperion by 

Dan Simmons: The Fall of Hyperion (Paperback, 2004, Gollancz) 4 stars

On the world called Hyperion, beyond the law of the Hegemony of Man, there waits …

Gladstone nodded, saw her aide out, and stepped back to the fatline cubicle in its concealed niche in the wall. She activated sonic privacy fields and coded the transmission diskey for the Consul’s ship. Every fatline receiver in the Web, Outback, galaxy, and universe would monitor the squirt, but only the Consul’s ship could decode it. Or so she hoped.

The Fall of Hyperion by 

Dan Simmons: The Fall of Hyperion (Paperback, 2004, Gollancz) 4 stars

On the world called Hyperion, beyond the law of the Hegemony of Man, there waits …

I was thinking about how free of mobs recent centuries had been: to create a mob there must be public meetings, and public meetings in our time consisted of individuals communing via the All Thing or other datasphere channels; it is hard to create mob passion when people are separated by kilometers and light-years, connected only by comm lines and fatline threads.

The Fall of Hyperion by 

Jack Halberstam: The Queer Art of Failure (2011) 4 stars

"The Queer Art of Failure is about finding alternatives—to conventional understandings of success in a …

Bégaudeau asks the students to think about what they have learned and write down one thing to take away from the class, one concept, text, or idea that might have made a dif f erence. Th e class disperses, and one girl shuf f l es up to the front. Th e teacher looks at her expectantly and draws out her comment. “I didn’t learn anything,” she tells him without malice or anger, “nothing. . . . I can’t think of anything I learned.” Th e moment is a defeat for the teacher and a disappointment for the viewer, who wants to believe in a narrative of educational uplift, but it is a triumph for alternative pedagogies because it reminds us that learning is a two- way street and you cannot teach without a dialogic re-lation to the learner.

The Queer Art of Failure by  (Page 13)

Ursula K. Le Guin: No Time to Spare: Thinking About What Matters (2017, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) 4 stars

From acclaimed author Ursula K. Le Guin, a collection of thoughts always adroit, often acerbicon …

I never wanted to blog before. I’ve never liked the word blog—I suppose it is meant to stand for bio-log or something like that, but it sounds like a sodden tree trunk in a bog, or maybe an obstruction in the nasal passage (Oh, she talks that way because she has such terrible blogs in her nose). I was also put off by the idea that a blog ought to be “interactive,” that the blogger is expected to read people’s comments in order to reply to them and carry on a limitless conversation with strangers. I am much too introverted to want to do that at all. I am happy with strangers only if I can write a story or a poem and hide from them behind it, letting it speak for me.

No Time to Spare: Thinking About What Matters by