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S.L. Crane

slcrane@bookwyrm.social

Joined 1 year, 3 months ago

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S.L. Crane's books

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Anne Mette Hancock: Corpse Flower (2021, Crooked Lane Books) 3 stars

Entertaining but nothing special

3 stars

Content warning Major plot point

reviewed One by One by Ruth Ware

Ruth Ware: One by One (Paperback, 2021, Vintage) 4 stars

Snow is falling in the exclusive alpine ski resort of Saint Antoine, as the shareholders …

Entertaining page-turner with only minor flaws

4 stars

This was the first book by Ruth Ware I read, and I'll certainly be back for more. The reveal of the killer's identity is delayed as long as possible (there are clues along the way, but none are absolutely conclusive to keep you guessing for a while), and the setting in the isolated chalet in the ice-cold Alps adds a chilling effect in every sense of the word. One thing that bugged me a bit is the lack of unique character voices. The story is told in first person and alternates between the POVs of two characters (the name of the POV character is given at the beginning of each chapter). Both of them are young women, and they sound exactly the same. For example, the author's little linguistic tic of using a double "very" (as in "this is very, very bad" or "the person is very, very dead") pops …

Stacey Abrams: While Justice Sleeps (2021, Doubleday) 3 stars

Avery, a promising young law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Howard Wynn, becomes her boss's …

A very disappointing read

2 stars

Praise by well-known authors for "While Justice Sleeps" promised a high-stakes thriller with a masterfully crafted plot, an authentic voice, and an utterly compelling main character – but the book delivered none of that. Granted, the first third of the book with numerous setups and mysterious connections between various characters had me intrigued. But things quickly went downhill from there. The narrative voice was all over the place, switching randomly from omniscient POV to deep POV to internal thoughts of multiple characters, including some very minor ones. In many scenes, this kind of head-hopping happened from one sentence to the next, resulting in a disjointed reading experience with neither character growth nor consistency. The promised high stakes also remained rather unclear, with a lot of exposition and legal lingo filling the pages, trying to make the story sound more sophisticated than it actually is. Even the final showdown lacked any …