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nerd teacher [books]

whatanerd@bookwyrm.social

Joined 3 years, 1 month ago

Anarchist educator who can be found at nerdteacher.com where I muse about school and education-related things, and all my links are here. My non-book posts are mostly at @whatanerd@treehouse.systems, occasionally I hide on @whatanerd@eldritch.cafe, or you can email me at n@nerdteacher.com. [they/them]

I was a secondary literature and humanities teacher who has swapped to being a tutor, so it's best to expect a ridiculously huge range of books.

And yes, I do spend a lot of time making sure book entries are as complete as I can make them. Please send help.

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nerd teacher [books]'s books

Currently Reading (View all 14)

Picture Books (View all 126)

Middle Grade (View all 26)

2024 Reading Goal

52% complete! nerd teacher [books] has read 26 of 50 books.

Rumiko Takahashi: InuYasha, Vol. 6 (2003, VIZ Media) 4 stars

Through magic, Kikyou, the priestess who originally killed Inu-Yasha, has taken over Kagome's body. Is …

The Same Character is the Best and Worst Part of this Volume

3 stars

I do like Miroku, particularly when they let him be a sincere character. His lecherous behaviour is often played for a joke, and it gets tiresome after a while. Even with other characters commenting on it (mostly being annoyed about it), it often is played for laughs or used as a means to drum up the perpetual jealousy in the unspecified relationship between Kagome and InuYasha.

Though the story is still fun, these things have definitely grown more infuriating and boring as I've gotten older.

Mary Jo Maynes: Schooling in Western Europe (1985, State University of New York Press) No rating

Mary Jo Maynes looks to school reform in early modern Europe to show the relevance …

One of the earliest revisionist insights brought to bear upon our understanding of the schooling process was that the people involved in the reform the pedagogic theorists, school officials, local volunteers, and the like represented specific kinds of class interests. A new and critical reading of the documents on educational policy and theory has emphasized the extent to which the goals of reform were repressive in character, that is, aimed at disciplining and containing the classes on whose behalf they were put forward. This argument has challenged the more common emphasis upon the progressive character of reform, and opened up for reexamination many other aspects of schooling history as well.

Schooling in Western Europe by  (Page 4)

Mary Jo Maynes: Schooling in Western Europe (1985, State University of New York Press) No rating

Mary Jo Maynes looks to school reform in early modern Europe to show the relevance …

Schools are viewed as means of fixing individuals into social positions largely determined by the constraints of the given social structure and by their initial class position in it. According to this critical approach, the dominant belief in the independent power of education to assign social roles serves the function of getting the lower classes to accept the existing social order by persuading them that those in positions of power are there by reason of their personal merit.

Schooling in Western Europe by  (Page 3)

Mary Jo Maynes: Schooling in Western Europe (1985, State University of New York Press) No rating

Mary Jo Maynes looks to school reform in early modern Europe to show the relevance …

That educational accomplishments determine career patterns and social success is central to theoretical traditions now dominant in most Western nations, and to popular understanding of and justification for education, as well. This faith in the efficacy of education in channeling the most talented individuals into prestigious, powerful, and highly remunerated social positions naturally deflects criticism of the inequalities characteristic of advanced industrial societies. In contrast with earlier types of inequality, the newer forms can be defended as, to a great extent, the result of differences in individual merit.

Schooling in Western Europe by  (Page 3)

Mary Jo Maynes: Schooling in Western Europe (1985, State University of New York Press) No rating

Mary Jo Maynes looks to school reform in early modern Europe to show the relevance …

But there was relatively little discussion of the process of implementation of school reform, or of its consequences. All reforms were generally assumed to be "progressive," and were interpreted as signs either of spreading democratization or of increasing enlightenment on the part of the state, church, or lay reformers. Furthermore, research rarely strayed from the administrative documents that recounted the activities of state and church agencies, or the writings of pedagogic theorists. The perspective typically adopted was that of the proponents of schooling. The focus of research in educational history until recently has been to trace the origins of new ideas about education or to track down the political and administrative processes by which those ideas were translated into official policy in various European states.

Schooling in Western Europe by  (Page 1)

C.S. Fritz: A Fig for All the Devils (Paperback, 2021, Albatross Book Co) 3 stars

An abused, grief-stricken, and impoverished Sonny has all but given up on life. That is, …

Liked what it attempted to do, but don't feel it actually succeeded in doing it well.

2 stars

I feel like this book failed to actually hit the notes it was attempting to hit. It wanted to work through abuse, death, and grief but really felt like it was forcing the wrong characters to learn lessons when they were meant to be the narrative devices through which the protagonist Sonny (and his family) were meant to learn.

Much of the exploration felt incredibly superficial, with Sonny just moving on through processing the abuses he endured. This isn't to say that there's one right way to process and deal with abuse, but there was nothing that actually made Sonny engage with what he experienced. In a good chunk of the novel, it was very much "tell don't show" or "show but gloss over."

Overall, it's an interesting attempt, but I left it feeling very unsatisfied. I was even left frustrated by the ending, which I think should've had consequences …