Number9Dream

Paperback, 416 pages

English language

Published Feb. 11, 2003 by Random House Trade Paperbacks.

ISBN:
9780812966923

View on OpenLibrary

3 stars (12 reviews)

4 editions

Review of 'Number9Dream' on 'Goodreads'

3 stars

Probably my least favorite Mitchell so far. There are bits I like, but overall it's confusing. When it's good, it's really good, but some chapters just go on forever. Each chapter kinda has its own gimmick, like what-ifs, the protagonist sharing his dreams or reading stories.

The end was confusing and not satisfying at all.

Review of 'Number9Dream' on 'Goodreads'

3 stars

I read this book a couple of years ago - I am trying to clear a way a stack of books I have not written reviews for. But I remember enjoying it a lot but felt that Mitchell's later works showed more finesse and form ("Cloud Atlas," "The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet"). The novel is a playful, dream-like adventure of Eiji Miyake, a young Japanese boy from the country in Tokyo searching for his absent father. The plot is somewhat predictable but one of the fun aspects of the novel is that Eiji has a fertile imagination and many times you cannot tell if you are in a dream or in reality. It is a story of a young boy dealing with absence and loss and also a story of a traveler to Tokyo lost in the whirling fantasy of the world's largest metropolis. Recommended.

Review of 'Number9Dream' on 'Goodreads'

2 stars

I enjoyed [b:The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet|7141642|The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet|David Mitchell|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1320540908s/7141642.jpg|7405757], and when I discovered Mitchell had an earlier book set in Japan, I was eager to check it out. While there are some great moments and I was eager to see where the story led, overall I was disappointed.

This book tells the story of a Miyake Eiji, a youth from rural Japan who travels to Tokyo in a search for the father he never knew. Eiji also has a propensity for vivid dreaming, both of the waking and nocturnal varieties, and as a result the line between real world events and fantasy are frequently blurred.

The book is at its best when Mitchell describes Tokyo (a city in which I've lived nearly half my life) and the island of Yakushima (which I've had the pleasure of visiting), but the surrealistic interludes became more …

avatar for Vincent

rated it

4 stars
avatar for Tenzin

rated it

3 stars
avatar for Tenzin

rated it

3 stars
avatar for chris_st

rated it

3 stars
avatar for marcuslowx

rated it

4 stars
avatar for sdivyank

rated it

5 stars
avatar for knodalyte

rated it

4 stars
avatar for steven.watt

rated it

4 stars
avatar for fabriek

rated it

2 stars

Subjects

  • Literary
  • Fiction
  • Fiction - General
  • General
  • Fiction / General