Night Film

a novel

606 pages

English language

Published Jan. 5, 2014

OCLC Number:
870516834

View on OpenLibrary

4 stars (11 reviews)

"Ashley Cordova, the mysterious gifted daughter of the reclusive film director Stanislas Cordova, is found dead in an abandoned warehouse in lower Manhattan. Her death is ruled a suicide, but veteran investigative journalist Scott McGrath suspects otherwise. What happened to Ashley? As McGrath tries to uncover the truth, he is drawn into a spell-binding quest in the underworld of the Cordova family's life. With breakneck pace and dazzling inventiveness, Night Film will hold you in suspense until you turn the final page."--Page 4 of cover.

5 editions

Review of 'Night Film' on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

This was another book where I enjoyed it...until the end. If you are going to take me down a supernatural road, you better not Scooby Doo me at the end. Don't tell me there are g-g-g-ghosts and then have it turn out to be the creepy old man from the gas station.

Still, I enjoy Ms. Pessl's writing and character development, so I suspect I will be reading Neverworld Wake at some point. I especially enjoyed the description of Cordova's films. I wish they had been real.

Review of 'Night Film' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

This got a bit messy near the end, but I'm willing to overlook that because the rest of it was SO FUN.

The book opens with a reclusive director's daughter committing suicide. A washed up journalist who lost his credibility by reporting on the director in the past is compelled to investigate the suicide. A mystery unfolds that has him trotting all over Manhattan (along with two unlikely sidekicks) in his quest for the truth.

Review of 'Night Film' on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

If I look at a book from the standpoint of what it made me experience, this one didn't just leave me sitting there in the movie theater. I was constantly involved and rarely skipped over anything, plus I exited with an inchoate understanding that I lacked on entering.

The conclusion, oddly, reminded me of the ending of Portnoy's Complaint--“Perhaps now we can begin.” which Roth dubbed a punchline. I couldn't escape noticing that Cordova's films all have ambiguous or unsettled endings, the unsettledness being the point, but though Night Film ends somewhat in that fashion, it is really more settled than it appears in that now we can really begin to live, not because we've slaughtered the lamb (a reference to Cordova's philosophy of life) but because we've ceased to chase or be chased. At least I hope so. That's the conclusion you hope to reach sooner or later (getting …

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Subjects

  • Fathers and daughters
  • Subculture
  • Investigative reporting
  • Suicide
  • Fiction