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Derek Caelin

DerekCaelin@bookwyrm.social

Joined 3 months, 1 week ago

Building a Solarpunk Future

Climate Feminist | Biodiversity | Open Source Software | Civic Tech | Games | Justice | Regenerative Ag | Green Energy | He/Him/His.

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Derek Caelin's books

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2022 Reading Goal

12% complete! Derek Caelin has read 6 of 50 books.

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Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist (2017, Random House Business Books) 5 stars

Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist is a 2017 non-fiction book …

There are now more than 2,000 billionaires living in 20 countries from the United States, China and Russia to Turkey, Thailand, and Indonesia. An annual wealth tax levied at just 1.5 percent of their net worth would raise $74 billion each year: that alone would be enough to fill the funding gap to get every child into school and deliver essential health services in all low-income countries.

Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist by 

Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist (2017, Random House Business Books) 5 stars

Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist is a 2017 non-fiction book …

Eye Opening

5 stars

As someone who studiously avoided economics classes in college, I feel ill-equipped to consider, let alone judge, economic policies. I had the impression that economic growth was bad for our ecological stability l, but couldn't explain why. I loved Doughnut Economics because it covered economic history and concepts approachably, and gave alternative models for thinking about economics. From now on, I won't care about narratives of economic growth - I'll want to hear about how quality of life is improving and our biosphere is thriving.

Sustainable Web Design (A Book Apart) 4 stars

The internet may be digital, but it carries a very physical cost. From image files …

Good Green Read

4 stars

In the goal of creating a green future, we're going to have to figure out how to tackle the emissions of our digital infrastructure. Websites are highly energy consumptive, and this book is about how we might reduce the carbon emissions. Greenwood covers a lot of ground, but the areas of action I see are these: we need to reduce the amount of energy our websites consume, and what energy the websites do consume should come from green sources. As climate scientist Leah Stokes points out, if we greenify our energy consumption oh, we've got a long way towards accomplishing our goal!

Sustainable Web Design (A Book Apart) 4 stars

The internet may be digital, but it carries a very physical cost. From image files …

According to HTTP Archive, the median number of images on any webpage is approximately thirty, with a total transfer size of 1 MB—equivalent to one hundred fifty thousand words of lorem ipsum in an HTML file (http://bkaprt.com/swd/03-03/). That’s more than four times the length of this book! Even if a picture does speak a thousand words, it’s still far less efficient than text.

We therefore need to think carefully about our use of images on the web. Like everything, we first need to question what value each image in our designs actually brings. Does it help the user to understand something, or is it critical to making the user experience enjoyable? Often the answer is yes, but in the case of stock photography, the answer is probably more commonly no. What is the user really gaining from that photo of a team of twenty-somethings pointing their fingers at a fake graph?

Sustainable Web Design by  (Page 43)

I feel called out. :p

Sustainable Web Design (A Book Apart) 4 stars

The internet may be digital, but it carries a very physical cost. From image files …

...In the 1950s.... the American Can Company, Owens-Illinois Glass Company, Coca-Cola, and the Dixie Cup company got together to design a solution to the growing pressure to regulate disposable packaging. They knew the issue of litter would not go away and was increasingly unpopular with the public, but disposable packaging was incredibly profitable. They needed a way to avoid regulation that might limit the use of disposables, and their solution was cunning.

They founded a nonprofit called Keep America Beautiful and poured significant amounts of money into environmental awareness campaigns. This helped them look good, but the real genius was in the message behind the campaigns - that litter on the streets had nothing to do with the producers, but was the fault of the person who dropped it - the litterbug. Keep America Beautiful managed to shift the entire debate around Americas garbage and litter problems away from the industry and on to consumers, and the strategy has been copied to time and time again since.

Sustainable Web Design by  (Page 18)

Sound familiar?

Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist (2017, Random House Business Books) 5 stars

Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist is a 2017 non-fiction book …

When Adam Smith published 'The Wealth of Nations' in 1776, there were fewer than one billion people alive, and in dollar terms, size of the global economy was three hundred times smaller than it is today. When Paul Samuelson published 'Economics' in 1948, there were not yet three billion people on earth, and the global economy was still ten times smaller than it is today. In the twenty-first century, we have left behind the era of the 'Empty World' when the flow of energy and matter through the global economy with small of relation to the capacity of nature's sources and sinks. We live now, says Daly, in 'Full World', with an economy that exceeds Earth's regenerative and absorptive capacity by over-harvesting sources such as fish and forests, and overfilling sinks such as the atmosphere and oceans.

Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist by  (Page 65)