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mouse

mouse@bookwyrm.social

Joined 3 years, 9 months ago

it's me, I'm the creator and admin of BookWyrm. buy me a book!

try me at @tripofmice@friend.camp for non-reading content and @bookwyrm@tech.lgbt for technical stuff

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mouse's books

Currently Reading (View all 6)

2024 Reading Goal

57% complete! mouse has read 30 of 52 books.

Hans Zinsser: Rats, Lice and History (Hardcover, 1996, Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, Distributed by Workman Pub. Co.) 5 stars

The classic chronicle of the impact disease and plagues have had on history and society …

I am over 160 pages into this book which is ostensibly a biography of typhus, and so far it has covered at length:

  • the nature of art,
  • whether or not he should write this book,
  • the origins and fundamentally parasitic nature of life,
  • the role of epidemic disease in various periods of history, each section of which he concludes that there's no reason to think typhus was present at that time.

It's the perfect book; it's like he wrote this book just for me.

Hans Zinsser: Rats, Lice and History (Hardcover, 1996, Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, Distributed by Workman Pub. Co.) 5 stars

The classic chronicle of the impact disease and plagues have had on history and society …

…it has often been claimed that since so many brilliant men had syphilis, much of the world’s greatest achievement was evidently formulated in brains stimulated by the cerebral irritation of an early general paresis. We omit reference to specific instances of this among our contemporaries only to avoid, for our publishers, the vulgar embarrassment of libel suits.

Rats, Lice and History by  (Page 62)

Hans Zinsser: Rats, Lice and History (Hardcover, 1996, Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, Distributed by Workman Pub. Co.) 5 stars

The classic chronicle of the impact disease and plagues have had on history and society …

It is pertinent, in this connection, to ask oneself, what would have been the result if D. H. Lawrence had been a professional instead of an occassional painter. A painted Lady Chatterley -- the most exquisite technique not withstanding -- would surely have been so completely out of drawing, with the lower parts so much larger than the upper, as to have been hardly recognizable as a human figure. the picture could not have been hung, even in a speak-easy.

Rats, Lice and History by  (Page 30)

imagine having a conversation with this man, given that this is how he writes about bacteriology (presumably) with an editor in tow.