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wrul

wrul@bookwyrm.social

Joined 11 months, 2 weeks ago

they (en), yel (fr), etc. Nairm & Birrarung-ga, Kulin biik gopher://breydon.id.au | https://breydon.id.au/reading

Testing out a stenography system by remarking on the odd good sit-down. Sometimes nicking vocab from non-ficcy bits.

Let me know if we know each other from elsewhere, and please feel free to say hi (or not) either way!

My user avatar is a rainbow lorikeet feeding on orange gum blossoms.

Ratings, roughly: “Half” stars (to approximate zero) seemed almost pure harm and were poorly written. 1s were slogs and wastes. 2s I would have refused publication pending thorough rounds of redrafts, reframing, and/or reresearch. 3s read neither fantastically nor awfully, or they did both just enough that it cancelled out — unless they delighted but I barely began, so couldn’t reliably say. 4s held something, substantial, of distinct interest or especial enjoyment, which might richly reward a deliberate revisiting. 5s may not ring perfect to me, but I would gift or receive with unhesitating gladness.

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Native Plants of Melbourne and Adjoining Areas (Paperback, 1999, Bloomings Books) 5 stars

As Melbourne’s urban sprawl continues so the pressure on the remaining patches of bushland increases …

The lip is delicately hinged and trembles in the slightest breeze.

Native Plants of Melbourne and Adjoining Areas by , (Page 119)

A warm round of applause, please, for Genoplesium morrisii!

Aside: the photo on facing page 118 of G. despectans, with ruddy purple flowers genuflecting from their blue-green spike against a hazy mauve and blue background, is an eye-catcher. And it’s nice to be stuck.

Native Plants of Melbourne and Adjoining Areas (Paperback, 1999, Bloomings Books) 5 stars

As Melbourne’s urban sprawl continues so the pressure on the remaining patches of bushland increases …

Leafless terrestrial orchid with a thick subterranean rhizome […]

[…]

Cultivation Impossible to grow.

Native Plants of Melbourne and Adjoining Areas by , (Page 117)

This is pallid brown Gastrodia sesamoides, flowering around bushfire season in the hills and eastern suburbs, smelling of spice, from up to half a metre above the ground!

Native Plants of Melbourne and Adjoining Areas (Paperback, 1999, Bloomings Books) 5 stars

As Melbourne’s urban sprawl continues so the pressure on the remaining patches of bushland increases …

Native Plants of Melbourne and Adjoining Areas (Paperback, 1999, Bloomings Books) 5 stars

As Melbourne’s urban sprawl continues so the pressure on the remaining patches of bushland increases …

[Chiloglottis reflexa flowers] are pollinated by male thynnine wasps which attempt to mate with the lip.

Native Plants of Melbourne and Adjoining Areas by , (Page 63)

I would like to know who thynnine wasps are, please.

[Chiloglottis valida] is pollinated in a similar way to C. reflexa, but by a different species of wasp. ⸻ pg. 64

By the by.

Native Plants of Melbourne and Adjoining Areas (Paperback, 1999, Bloomings Books) 5 stars

As Melbourne’s urban sprawl continues so the pressure on the remaining patches of bushland increases …

A fast-growing species which was apparently widely distributed on the goldfields by Chinese diggers.

Native Plants of Melbourne and Adjoining Areas by , (Page 60)

Cassinia arcuata, everyone!

The flowerheads, in “long, drooping clusters of shiny brown” look at least as intensely familiar as the association of a curry scent with a similar binomial, but Bun’s plant was much denser than the Jones photo depicts.

However, it was very frequently-pruned, and I have a sense of growth reaching upwards in something like the manner of a trimmed magnolia branch. More research needed, then.

All Boys Aren't Blue (AudiobookFormat, 2021, Penguin Random House Children's UK) 5 stars

This powerful YA memoir-manifesto follows journalist and LGBTQ+ activist George M. Johnson as they explore …

Although I couldn’t wait to escape New Jersey, her album gave me the opportunity to escape in my mind. I would sit in my car by myself and blast her. Every song spoke to me. Her femininity was everything that I was feeling inside of me. She was just so sassy, and sexy, and powerful. I wanted to be her. Well, not really be her, but I would daydream about her. I wanted to be me, in Virginia, and dancing to her. I wanted to be me dancing to her.

All Boys Aren't Blue by 

Track 17 ‘Chapter 13: Setting myself free, or setting myself up’, 07:04–07:34

On listening to Beyoncé’s first solo album while yearning to be gay away at college.

All Mixed Up (AudiobookFormat, 2022, ABC Audio) No rating

Candid and heartfelt, All Mixed Up is a compelling true story about trauma, identity and …

All around us, the suburbs spoke with a constant [fizzes tongue against top teeth] of electricity and the distant [exhales forcefully yet evenly through open mouth] of traffic.

All Mixed Up by 

Track 2 ‘Chapter One’, 12:37–12:45

On growing up in Oakleigh in the 1980s. Both quotations of suburbia produced at (perfectly just uncomfortable) length.

The Space Between Worlds (Paperback, 2020, Hodder & Stoughton) 4 stars

Eccentric genius Adam Bosch has cracked the multiverse and discovered a way to travel to …

structurally and emotionally accomplished

5 stars

I had wanted something to read where I did not feel obligated or compelled to take notes, but then there were so many phrases buttressing the plot worth noting down, that I quickly ran out of bookmarks — even despite abandoning a majority of Johnson’s sharpest constructions to the depths of pages read. So, by a third in, I guessed that regardless of how I was to find this novel in any other respects, The space between worlds was at least a four star piece for revisitability. The word-to-word texture remained more prosaic than I fully take to in fiction, but there is much to appreciate in what Johnson has built, and how.

Insurgent Empire (2019, Verso Books) 4 stars

[Walter] Mignolo is right to suggest that ‘emancipation’, as it was figured in European liberal discourse, is different from ‘liberation’ as it is conceived of in ‘decolonial’ discourse[…] At the same time, a disproportionate emphasis on radically different ‘categories of thought’ obscures the extent to which many ‘liberation’ struggles were committed to universalism — and not only because they were part of the dominant language or the colonizer’s categories of thought. Indeed, rather than offer sutured, self-contained alternatives to the idea of universal freedom, resistance often deliberately showed up the colonizer’s version of universalism to be anything but universal. Universals had to be embodied through experience and resistance, not refused as ‘European’. This often entailed working with the ‘logic of modernity’, decolonizing rather than repudiating it, teasing out its revolutionary promises.

Insurgent Empire by  (Page 26)

Late in a killer, long paragraph, through which Gopal disputes assertions of Walter D. Mignolo, ‘Delinking: The Rhetoric of Modernity, the Logic of Coloniality and the Grammar of De-coloniality’, Cultural Studies 21:2 (2007), p. 453.

Insurgent Empire (2019, Verso Books) 4 stars

Both abolition and decolonization — twin outcomes of Britain’s expansionary colonial project over three centuries — are all too frequently regarded as deriving chiefly from the campaigning consciences of white British reformers or as the logical outcome of the liberal and liberalizing project that empire ostensibly always was, conquering in order to free.

Insurgent Empire by  (Page 3)

Insurgent Empire (2019, Verso Books) 4 stars

But is it anachronistic to subject the Empire to searching criticism? This book is in part a response to that question and in part a very different take on the history of the British Empire to what is generally available in the British public sphere. In academia, a retrograde strain of making the so-called case for colonialism is now resurgent. As a scholar whose previous work had been on dissident writing in the Indian subcontinent as it transitioned to independence, I was aware that all societies and cultures have radical and liberationist currents woven into their social fabric as well as people who spoke up against what was being done in their name: why would Britain in the centuries of imperial rule be an exception? At the same time, I also wanted to probe the tenacious mythology that ideas of ‘freedom’ are uniquely British in conception and that independence itself was a British ‘gift’ to the colonies along with the railways and the English language. The result is a study which looks at the relationship between British critics of empire and the great movements of resistance to British rule which emerged across colonial contexts. The case against colonialism, it will be seen, was made repeatedly over the last couple of centuries and it emerged through an understanding of resistance to empire.

Insurgent Empire by 

pp. viii–ix

In ‘Acknowledgements’, which are unusually, refreshingly narrative.