So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love

English language

Published July 29, 2012

ISBN:
9781455509102

View on Inventaire

4 stars (7 reviews)

6 editions

Review of "So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love" on 'GoodReads'

3 stars

This book falls into the category of books that I like to call "Fast-food books". They won't necessarily make you healthier or your mind sounder, but it'll feel really good while you're eating them. There's only so many anecdotes you can digest. The most common criticism that people have with these kind of books are that they could've been summarized in a much shorter format - probably a blog post or two. The same applies here - only the irony is that it is BECAUSE of those blog posts and the reaction it generated that prompted the author to write a whole book about it.



Probably should have let the blogs say it all.



Well, now that my rant is over, I'd like to list some of the positive things that I got out of this book. While tiring at times, reading through the different stories and the paths ordinary …

Review of "So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love" on 'GoodReads'

3 stars

I'm between jobs right now so I figured I might as well read this. I came into it having heard that it was the book about how it's more important to be good at what you do than to like what you do.



I came into it with the following mindset:

- It makes sense that, to have a job that is good, you should yourself be good at doing stuff. So getting good at doing stuff should be your top priority!

- However, it seems important to believe in the mission of your work. Shouldn't this be your top priority, too?



So one big question for me was how to reconcile those two points. I think Cal Newport does it fairly nicely. The basic argument is that desirable job traits such as mission alignment and creative control are things you need to buy with "career capital" i.e. being good …

Review of "So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love" on 'Storygraph'

4 stars

This book makes an interesting argument: "Don't follow your passion!". It's much better to master skills first and then that will lead you to a passionate career or life.It explores this question thoroughly using case studies of real people's lives: a writer, a musician, a biologist, a venture capitalist, an archaeologist and entrepreneurs.I liked the idea of differentiating between a "passion mindset" and a "craftsman mindset". The author argues that you have to offer the world something (craftsman) and not wait for the revelation of perfect a predestined passion. It's essentially the difference between being active and passive.The structure of the book is very academic because the author summarizes a lot: the concepts written earlier (within a chapter), the whole chapter after you finish reading it and the final chapter of the book summarizes pretty much everything.It's not a long book but the summarizing structure tired me a little when …

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