The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

A History of Nazi Germany

paperback, 1264 pages

Published Nov. 15, 1990 by Simon & Schuster.

ISBN:
978-0-671-72868-7
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4 stars (26 reviews)

"Since it's publication five decades ago, William L. Shirer?s monumental study of Hitler?s empire has been widely acclaimed as the definitive record of the twentieth century?s blackest hours. A worldwide bestseller with millions of copies in print, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich offers an unparalleled and thrillingly told examination of how Adolf Hitler nearly succeeded in conquering the world. Here, in a thoughtful new introduction for the fiftieth anniversary of its National Book Award win, Ron Rosenbaum, author of the much-admired Explaining Hitler, takes a fresh and penetrating look at this vital and enduring classic and the role it continues to play in today?s discussions of the history of Nazi Germany"--The publisher.

40 editions

Review of 'The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich' on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

Important reading in these days of re-emergent fascism in America, lest we fail to learn the lessons of history. This is one of the most thorough and definitive accounts of modern history's greatest evil. If your goal is researching the many details of Hitler's rise to power that parallel Trump's, you only need to read about the first 1/4 of this incredibly well-researched 1960 account of, as the title indicates, the rise and fall of the Nazis. The whole thing is worth reading (although it totals 1,200+ pages, so I had to race through during the library's 3-week loan time). But it's in the first 1/3 that you see the obsession with demonizing and persecuting a religious minority, the mental instability, the reliance on propaganda and suppression of a free press, the insistence that the country was increasingly spinning out of control and only he could guarantee safety -- the …

Review of 'The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich' on 'Storygraph'

5 stars

This is reprinted from my blog Near Earth Object.

The edition that I own of William Shirer’s The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich advertises that the book is one that “shocked the conscience of the world.” I saw this mainly as an indication of what the book must have meant to a public that might not have been as familiar with the crimes of the Nazis and, well, accustomed as we are today to frequent and thoughtless analogies; from goofy Mel Brooks Hitler parodies to the Soup Nazi, as a society we seem to have digested this period of human history as just that, a period of history, distant and with little relevance.

I think we may be doing a disservice to ourselves. I don’t mean to say that this terrible period should not be the subject of humor and satire — it must! — but having …

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