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Tomat0

Tomat0@bookwyrm.social

Joined 1 year, 4 months ago

I mostly read non-fiction books on academic subjects although I'll read a few other stuff here and there.

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The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1969) No rating

Essays which state the fundamentals of Jung's psychological system: "On the Psychology of the Unconscious" …

Though the Christian view of the world has paled for many people, the symbolic treasure-rooms of the East are still full of marvels that can nourish for a long time to come the passion for show and new clothes. What is more, these images—be they Christian or Buddhist or what you will—are lovely, mysterious, richly intuitive. Naturally, the more familiar we are with them the more does constant usage polish them smooth, so that what remains is only banal superficiality and meaningless paradox. The mystery of the Virgin Birth, or the homoousia of the Son with the Father, or the Trinity which is nevertheless not a triad—these no longer lend wings to any philosophical fancy. They have stiffened into mere objects of belief.

So it is not surprising if the religious need, the believing mind, and the philosophical speculations of the educated European are attracted by the symbols of the East—those grandiose conceptions of divinity in India and the abysms of Taoist philosophy in China—just as once before the heart and mind of the men of antiquity were gripped by Christian ideas. There are many Europeans who began by surrendering completely to the influence of the Christian symbol until they landed themselves in a Kierkegaardian neurosis, or whose relation to God, owing to the progressive impoverishment of symbolism, developed into an unbearably sophisticated I-You relationship—only to fall victims in their turn to the magic and novelty of Eastern symbols. This surrender is not necessarily a defeat; rather it proves the receptiveness and vitality of the religious sense.

The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (Collected Works 9i) by 

The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (1969) No rating

Essays which state the fundamentals of Jung's psychological system: "On the Psychology of the Unconscious" …

But if we try to establish what an archetype is psychologically, the matter becomes more complicated. So far mythologists have always helped themselves out with solar, lunar, meteorological, vegetal, and other ideas of the kind. The fact that myths are first and foremost psychic phenomena that reveal the nature of the soul is something they have absolutely refused to see until now. Primitive man is not much interested in objective explanations of the obvious, but he has an imperative need—or rather, his unconscious psyche has an irresistible urge—to assimilate all outer sense experiences to inner, psychic events. It is not enough for the primitive to see the sun rise and set; this external observation must at the same time be a psychic happening: the sun in its course must represent the fate of a god or hero who, in the last analysis, dwells nowhere except in the soul of man. All the mythologized processes of nature, such as summer and winter, the phases of the moon, the rainy seasons, and so forth, are in no sense allegories of these objective occurrences; rather they are symbolic expressions of the inner, unconscious drama of the psyche which becomes accessible to man’s consciousness by way of projection—that is, mirrored in the events of nature.

The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (Collected Works 9i) by 

The Epistle to the Romans (1933, Oxford university press, H. Milford) 5 stars

This volume provides a much-needed English translation of the sixth edition of what is considered …

Thus our tribulation, without ceasing to be tribulation or to be felt to be tribulation, is transformed. We must suffer, as we have suffered before. But our suffering is no longer a passive, dangerous, poisonous, destructive tribulation and perplexity, such as the souls of those who hate the Judge, but is transformed into a tribulation and perplexity which are creative, fruitful, powerful, promising, by which men are dissolved, cast to the ground, pressed into a corner, and imprisoned, by God. By tribulation we are braced to patience. Defence is turned into offence. The questionableness of our situation becomes a source of strength; for we are encouraged by the knowledge that this is God's way of saving us, and that it cannot be otherwise. We may doubt, but it is in God we doubt. We may kick against the pricks, but they are God's pricks. Blasphemy even, even the blasphemy of Job, is blasphemy against God.

The Epistle to the Romans by  (Page 156)

The Epistle to the Romans (1933, Oxford university press, H. Milford) 5 stars

This volume provides a much-needed English translation of the sixth edition of what is considered …

'Everything by which we are surrounded conflicts with the promise of God. He promises us immortality, but we are encompassed with mortality and corruption. He pronounces that we are righteous in His sight, but we are engulfed in sin. He declares His favor and goodwill towards us, but we are threatened by the tokens of His wrath. What can we do? It is his will that we should shut our eyes to what we are and have, so that nothing may impede or even check our faith in Him.' (Calvin).

Reason cannot attain unto it, only faith can achieve it. Faith as it were, creative of divinity.

The Epistle to the Romans by  (Page 143)

The Second Sex (2011, Vintage) 4 stars

Simone de Beauvoir’s essential masterwork is a powerful analysis of the Western notion of “woman,” …

These difficulties are more obvious for the independent woman because she has chosen not resignation but combat. All living problems find a silent solution in death; so a woman who works at living is more torn than one who buries her will and desires; but she will not accept being offered this as an example. She will consider herself at a disadvantage only when she compares herself with man.

The Second Sex by  (Page 939)

The Second Sex (2011, Vintage) 4 stars

Simone de Beauvoir’s essential masterwork is a powerful analysis of the Western notion of “woman,” …

The independent woman—and especially the intellectual who thinks through her situation—will suffer from an inferiority complex as a female; she does not have as much free time for beauty care as a flirt, whose only preoccupation is to seduce; while she might follow all the experts’ advice, she will never be more than an amateur in the elegance department; feminine charm demands that transcendence deteriorating into immanence no longer be anything more than a subtle carnal throb; she must be a spontaneously offered prey: the intellectual woman knows she is offering herself, she knows she is a consciousness, a subject; one cannot willfully kill one’s gaze and change one’s eyes into empty pools; a body that reaches out to the world cannot be thwarted and metamorphosed into a statue animated by hidden vibrations. The more the intellectual woman fears failure, the more zealously she will try; but this conscious zeal remains an activity and falls short of its goal.

The Second Sex by  (Page 939)