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Sean

seanderson13@bookwyrm.social

Joined 8 months, 1 week ago

I wish I read more fiction

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Jacques Rancière: Hatred of Democracy (2009, Verso) No rating

I suppose I ought to read this. It’s the basis of the argument in the Lundström book. I’m getting so worn out on (and wary of) of Eurocentric conceptions of democracy, freedom, and participation though. I would love for any of these Euro-US accounts of collaborative/collective governance to actually trace roots to, for example, ANY of the accounts in Isakhan and Stockwell. Or Kimmerer for that matter. Or Deloria.

Markus Lundström: Anarchist Critique of Radical Democracy (2023, PM Press) No rating

This book addresses the conflictual nature of radical democracy. By analyzing democratic conflict in Husby, …

While these days I’m hearing more and more-convincing critique of white anarchism from my abolitionist friends, I guess I am choosing to read about Swedish anarchism cause I continue to struggle with the value and concept of “democracy” versus liberty vs freedom vs justice vs equity… so I’m giving this a go.

Ursula K. Le Guin: The  Dispossessed (Hardcover, 1991, Harper Paperbacks) 4 stars

Shevek, a brilliant physicist, decides to take action. He will seek answers, question the unquestionable, …

So this is getting really interesting, reading this alongside Dunbar-Ortiz’s An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States. Questions about utopian visions of family and school resonate across to histories of cultural genocide by residential schools. The Terra Nullius of Anarres, open to be colonized by the white feminist anarchist imagination — there are no questions about indigeneity or conquest (yet). Looking forward to finishing both and pulling these threads apart and together.

Ursula K. Le Guin: The  Dispossessed (Hardcover, 1991, Harper Paperbacks) 4 stars

Shevek, a brilliant physicist, decides to take action. He will seek answers, question the unquestionable, …

A couple years ago I had a student who excitedly told me about how a teacher at her old school had introduced her to this amazing author who was now her very very favorite. Friends, that teacher had introduced her to Ayn Rand (aka Wario to Dorothy Day’s Mario). I bought a paperback copy of The Dispossessed online immediately with the hopes of turning the tide… but the student and her family had moved away before the book arrived. I kept it and am now reading it for a book club, and hoping that student found someone else down the road to steer her away from the ugliness of Randism.

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz: An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States (ReVisioning American History) (2015, Beacon Press) 5 stars

Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations …

Next book club book, following The Dawn of Everything. We’re trying to pair this with The Dispossessed to see where things might intersect. Right away, Dunbar-Ortiz says, “Those who seek history with an upbeat ending, a history of redemption and reconciliation, may look around and observe that such a conclusion is not visible, not even in utopian dreams of a better society.” So THAT’s something to think through with Le Guin…