The Underground Railroad

Os Caminhos Para a Liberdade

22.4 x 15.2 x 2 cm, 320 pages

Português language

Published April 25, 2017 by ‎HarperCollins.

ISBN:
978-85-9508-029-4
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4 stars (54 reviews)

Cora não consegue imaginar o mundo que há além da fazenda de algodão ― e nem poderia. Das poucas coisas que lhe era permitido saber, ela sabia que a Geórgia não era um estado amigável para fujões. As cores do sangue derramado e o som dos gritos dos escravos eram claros na sua mente, e seus sonhos eram habitados pela angústia de suas companheiras de senzala. Em uma alma sedenta por liberdade, qualquer convite para ver o mundo além das cercas parece uma fonte cristalina. Cora não sabia dos segredos que se escondiam nas veias de seu país. Até que Caesar, um jovem escravo, contou-lhe sobre a ferrovia subterrânea que os levaria até os Estados Livres, onde não há mais escravidão. Cora terá que atravessar os Estados Unidos e enfrentar terríveis desventuras. Mas nada pode conter sua coragem para transgredir as condições que lhe foram impostas – ela fará de …

7 editions

Review of 'The underground railroad' on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

"[...] E a América também é uma ilusão, a maior de todas. A raça branca acredita - acredita do fundo do coração - que é direito dela tomar a terra. Matar índios. Guerrear. Escravizar seus irmãos. Se há qualquer justiça no mundo, esta nação não deve existir, pois suas fundações são assassinato, roubo e crueldade. E no entanto aqui estamos."

In 'The Underground Railroad', de Colson Whitehead.

Review of 'The Underground Railroad' on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

Hits hard from the very beginning and keeps on hitting. Three hundred pages of cruelty; suffering; the very worst of humanity. Brief moments of respite, in each of which our heroes pause, catch their breath, wonder whether they're safe at last. (Not-much-of-a-spoiler alert: they're not). Further suffering ensues.

I found it heavyhanded at times— then again how could it not be? — and the writing uneven: beautiful at times, a slog near the end; but maybe that was just me. Like other books I've read recently, the reader is kept at a distance, but with third-person narrative that distance feels clinical, objective, not uncaring; the absence of connection coming out of self-preservation, a necessary response to a lifetime of loss.

The "railroad" gimmick didn't really work for me, but it was a minor plot point overall, unobtrusive.

Review of 'The underground railroad' on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

Whitehead writes with such precise and restrained prose it is easy to make a lot of assumptions in anticipation of the story as it unfolds. I'm guilty of that. Also guilty of being confused by his actual project as it emerged. In this novel, which I feel is less accessible than The Nickel Boys, the conceit that the underground railroad was an actual railroad running underground led me to assume this would be a fanciful tour of unrestrained wish fulfillment. I don't know why I assumed this but for some reason I expected Whitehead to use his powers as an author, descend on the plantations of the south, and save everyone, sort of like Tarantino murdering Hitler in Inglourius Basterds. This is not the project of The Underground Railroad, which is a serious story without any easy solutions, despite the extraordinary railroad.

The more I consider this novel, the more …

Review of 'The underground railroad' on 'Goodreads'

2 stars

I struggle with books about slavery. I read them not because I expect to enjoy them, but from a sense of obligation. It's a big part of this country's history, so I need to force myself to look at it. There's no doubt that Whitehead is a skilled writer. He creates compelling characters and the words seem to flow effortlessly. I feel like I must be a lazy reader, because I don't understand what he was trying to achieve by making the railroad an actual railroad. The rest of the book seemed pretty true to history, so it felt like a bit of a distraction, like if he'd otherwise told a believable story and made one of the characters an alien. It just felt unnecessary and didn't - to my mind - serve any real literary purpose. I've not read any other books by him, so maybe I simply lack …

Review of 'The Underground Railroad' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

For the first good chunk of this book, I asked myself why I was reading it. It was pure historical fiction about the time period when white Americans enslaved African Americans, and I've read many, many books about the casual cruelty of this era. Why was I putting myself through it again? I was so glad I hung in there. Whitehead's combination of historical fiction and fantasy—with some unexpected choices, such as giving us backstory AFTER we'd already formed an opinion on the character—was brilliant. It was a great combination—experimental but thoroughly grounded in reality; with a message but sneaky, tucked into unexpected places, such as the novel's structure. I much enjoyed it.

Review of 'The underground railroad' on 'Goodreads'

2 stars

This is another one of those big prize winning books that I just don't get. This one feels like it has been written by a student at school for their history lesson, there are some terrible lines, things like "the necklace of ears was worn round his neck" no way! a necklace worn round the neck, who'd have guessed the crazy stuff they got up to in the olden times before Facebook. I can only guess that that some bribery was done to get this included on the shortlist.

The story itself was dull for most of the time, I found myself wanting to skip ahead, luckily I stuck at it and got to read some of the really good parts of the story, finding out about Mabel was probably the best part.

I was thinking that maybe this was gonna be another To the Lighthouse book, luckily it was …

Review of 'The underground railroad' on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

It took me a little while to get into the rhythm of this book. But Whitehead has a genius for capturing broad swathes of the underbelly of American racial history and dynamics in a few short strokes of a vignette or a character portrait. His short, pointed chapter on the white character, Ethel, for example, is absolutely, damningly ingenious: "Ever since she saw a woodcut of a missionary surrounded by jungle natives, Ethel thought it would be spiritually fulfilling to serve the Lord in dark Africa, delivering savages to the light."

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Subjects

  • Ficção Histórica