Such a Fun Age

Hardcover

Published Aug. 8, 2019 by Putnam.

ISBN:
9780525541905

View on OpenLibrary

4 stars (8 reviews)

5 editions

Review of 'Such a Fun Age' on 'Goodreads'

2 stars

Dieses Buch hat mich ein wenig irritiert - Rassismus in all seinen Ausprägungen scheint dieses Jahr extrem viel Platz auf meinen Leselisten einzunehmen. Insofern fand ich es interessant, hier zwei weiße Protagonisten zu sehen, die völlig überzeugt sind, nicht rassistisch zu sein, allerdings auf eine verquere Art genau das sind - und dabei den Splitter im Auge des Gegenübers sehen, nicht aber den Balken im eigenen Auge.

Allerdings wirken alle Figuren auf mich künstlich, einschließlich der Protagonistin und ihren Freunden, das kleine Mädchen, dass sie betreut, wirkt auf mich absolut unglaubwürdig für eine Dreijährige (und ich habe wirklich merkwürdige Dreijährige kennengelernt).

Insofern - spannender Ansatz, aber in der Ausführung für mich leider nicht wirklich gelungen.

Review of 'Such a Fun Age' on 'GoodReads'

4 stars

Everybody's the hero of their own story.



## Why I picked it up ##



Mel told me she liked it, and wanted to talk to me about it



## What I liked about it ##



Nuance of character. Alix maintained a little bit of likability and sympathy right up to the very end.



Briar was cute as hell. I usually don't like the precocious kid trope but I guess it worked well here because she wasn't especially precocious. She was just a normal 3 year old.



## One thing I want to remember ##



The feeling of great sadness at the end when Emira spelled out why everybody in this book was miserable: "And some days, Emira would carry the dread that if Briar ever struggled to find herself, she'd probably just hire someone to do it for her."



Kelly relied on black people and black culture to define himself. …

Review of 'Such a Fun Age' on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

This stands atop the literary fiction I've read in 2020 as a refreshingly direct and compelling read with a lot of important themes for the 21st century literary fiction readers' customer base to digest. It feels to me like Kiley Reid wrote the Thanksgiving Dinner sequence as a short story initially - it's the only event in the book that gets multiple chapters devoted to it and the immediate fallout. As a result, there's definitely some racing-to-the-finish writing in the final part of the book, with a climax that feels theatrical at the expense of a really dialogue-rich confrontation. But overall, the writing for the protagonist, Emira, was excellent and the satirical jabs of Alix Chamberlain's privileged social circles was very satisfying.

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