Ancillary Justice

, #1

Paperback, 384 pages

English language

Published July 28, 2013 by Orbit.

ISBN:
978-0-356-50240-3
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OCLC Number:
863038839

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4 stars (37 reviews)

On a remote, icy planet, the soldier known as Breq is drawing closer to completing her quest.

Breq is both more than she seems and less than she was. Years ago, she was the Justice of Toren - a colossal starship and an artificial intelligence controlling thousands of soldiers in the service of the Radch, the empire that conquered the galaxy.

An act of treachery has ripped it all away, leaving her with only one fragile human body. But that might just be enough to take revenge against those who destroyed her.

12 editions

reviewed Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie (Imperial Radch, #1)

Really enjoyed this one

4 stars

This one took a bit of warming up to, the perspective of the main character/narrator was a bit hard to follow at first, but once I saw what was going on it became easier. Definitely a page turner. I enjoyed the novel perspective, and found myself quite attached to the characters by the end. A friend lent my all 3 of the books in the series, and I can't wait to dig into the next one.

Long, grand, easy & fun

4 stars

Space Opera in 3 parts — long, grand, sci-fi, easy & fun to read. Incidentally the main civilisation of the book does not distinguish gender, which is represented in the book by giving everybody female pronouns, which is kind of a cool reading experience. I like the depiction of fragile consciousness of the protagonist.

reviewed Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie (Imperial Radch, #1)

Review of 'Ancillary Justice' on 'Storygraph'

5 stars

This is a fantastic, page-turner of a book. The world building is superb and the characters are rich and believable.

But like all great science fiction there is much more to Ancillary Justice than just plot, world and character. Leckie tackles uses the book to ask some genuinely interesting questions about society, language, religion and gender. And beneath all of this is that fundamental question of all science fiction (or at least the sci-fi that I love): what does it mean to be human?

Ancillary Justice tells the story of a large ship Justice of Toren) or rather the ship’s AI. But this is not AI as we currently know it. Much of the book concerns itself with the relationship between reason and emotion. In order to be able to make decisions without looping through millions of possibilities ships have feelings. Importantly ships get attached to certain people just as …

reviewed Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie (Imperial Radch, #1)

Review of 'Ancillary Justice' on 'Goodreads'

3 stars

The book is an interesting piece of sci-fi. It's nighter the best nor the worst. It explores interesting concepts like multiple bodies, a society without gender, AI and galactic imperialism. All are explored in an intriguing way, that makes my thoughts explore the concepts deeper.

As for criticism, the book is quite a though read, it jumps in time quite a lot and the main character has multiple bodies that are quite hard to keep track of. This also makes the narrative quite hard to follow as I wasn't always knowing where and when the scene was taking place. Some form of indication maybe a location and time signifier in the beginning of the chapter would be nice. And even so the story is sadly not the best, it seems to me and I might have misunderstood to be a quite generic revenge story.

To summarise, this book explores multiple …

reviewed Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie (Imperial Radch, #1)

Review of 'Ancillary Justice' on 'Storygraph'

5 stars

This is the most enjoyable, engrossing novel—SF or otherwise— that I've read in a while. The cynic in me says that's because I don't read enough fiction; the optimist in me tells the cynic to shut up and just enjoy the moment.
There are a number of interesting ideas here: AI with feelings and emotions; people with hundreds or thousands of bodies (like the puppies from [b:A Fire Upon the Deep|77711|A Fire Upon the Deep (Zones of Thought, #1)|Vernor Vinge|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1333915005s/77711.jpg|1253374] writ large; very large). And what happens when the head of the government is pretty much the entire government? And also effectively immortal?
Granted, these same ideas mean that this isn't entry-level SF. But if you're someone who reads the slates of Hugo and Nebula nominees, you'll likely get a kick out of this.

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