Never Let Me Go

288 pages

English language

Published Oct. 28, 2006 by Vintage International.

ISBN:
978-1-4000-7877-6
Copied ISBN!
OCLC Number:
70236408

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4 stars (38 reviews)

From the Booker Prize-winning author of The Remains of the Day and When We Were Orphans, comes an unforgettable edge-of-your-seat mystery that is at once heartbreakingly tender and morally courageous about what it means to be human. Hailsham seems like a pleasant English boarding school, far from the influences of the city. Its students are well tended and supported, trained in art and literature, and become just the sort of people the world wants them to be. But, curiously, they are taught nothing of the outside world and are allowed little contact with it. Within the grounds of Hailsham, Kathy grows from schoolgirl to young woman, but it's only when she and her friends Ruth and Tommy leave the safe grounds of the school (as they always knew they would) that they realize the full truth of what Hailsham is.

9 editions

reviewed Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

Never Let Me Go

3 stars

Content warning premise spoilers

A Memory

4 stars

Content warning Spoiler Alert.

Review of 'Never Let Me Go' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

It’s dangerous to reminisce. There are so many ways to get trapped in the past: “if only I had...”; “things were so much better then...”; and we all know people stuck in their imaginary what-ifs. Then there’s reading someone else’s reminiscences—there’s so much that can go wrong there. In the right hands, though: wow. This was a masterpiece that kept me engaged and thinking; it will likely stay with me for a long time.

If you haven’t read this, and are over forty: read it. Don’t try to learn “what it’s about,” don’t read cover-jacket blurbs: this isn’t a book ”about” anything, it’s a journey; one in which you might find more than a handful of parallels with lives you recognize. Including perhaps your own. Ishiguro’s language and insights are sublime. Most importantly for me, the narrator’s voice was so perfect: he could’ve made her wistful, or bitter, or resentful. …

Review of 'Never Let Me Go' on 'Storygraph'

4 stars

NEVER LET ME GO is a quiet and circuitous reminiscence on a life lived which slowly unfurls into descriptions of an inescapable dystopian nightmare which proceeds at the ambling pace of ordinary existence, ending with a whimper. 

As a dystopia it’s quiet, the disturbing details coming in drips and drabs with a sense that Kathy as a narrator assumes the reader knows the system already and so is only paying attention to find out what her place was in it, not to learn what it is altogether. The narrative style meanders in time in order to be mostly clear in thought. It’s not linear, sometimes frustratingly so, but it was usually easy for me to follow because each bit of information is told based on its relevance to some other piece of the past. It has the disconnected quality of a long reminiscence while being generally understandable. 

Several of the …

Surprisingly good book!

5 stars

I picked this randomly, I've never read one of his books before, but I'm glad I did!

It's such an interesting book, the writing is surprisingly fitting for the story. It's such a nice way to build the world through someones eyes, that doesn't see how weird it is. I thought it would change on a specific direction after a certain plot point, but it didn't. It's strange to think about how they would think and what things they wouldn't even question. Why they wouldn't start a revolution, never even consider it. They are just so used to how things are laid out for them, it's just how it's supposed to be for them. I'm looking forward to his other books!

Review of 'Never let me go' on 'LibraryThing'

3 stars

On some level this is a deeply haunting book, confronting us with the people society leaves behind in a sympathetic first-person perspective. But the devices Ishiguro uses to achieve that effect also put me off the book itself. Without wanting to get too spoliery, the smallness of the narrator's world is kind of the point, but that doesn't change the fact that it's a slow paced book in a very small world, which I kept getting frustrated with.

Review of 'Never let me go' on 'LibraryThing'

3 stars

On some level this is a deeply haunting book, confronting us with the people society leaves behind in a sympathetic first-person perspective. But the devices Ishiguro uses to achieve that effect also put me off the book itself. Without wanting to get too spoliery, the smallness of the narrator's world is kind of the point, but that doesn't change the fact that it's a slow paced book in a very small world, which I kept getting frustrated with.

Review of 'Never Let Me Go' on 'Storygraph'

4 stars

This is probably closer to 3.5 stars, as I'm still not really sure how I felt about this book. It will definitely lead to a good discussion, I don't doubt that. It was just so...weird. Ishiguro presents a very morally ambiguous story (human clones created specifically for the use of their organs), without casting judgement. I think that to me is the most unsettling aspect of this book. The idea of these characters being clones is not even really explicitly stated until 3/4 of the way through the book. The kids talk about it, but it's very casually mentioned and basically dismissed (or at least it seemed to be at the time) after a time. And where and from whom did these clones spring? There's no...beginning, and no real end. So disturbing.

Review of 'Never let me go' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

It's hard to convey what sort of novel this is without saying too much--an important part of the reading experience is the unfolding of what is, for a whole sub-population, a mystery.

Told in the first person by Kathy, one of a group of children (focusing on Kathy, Ruth, and Tommy) brought up in a rather idyllic boarding school, sheltered from the outside world. And right away, many questions nag the reader: where are the parents? Why the unusual education? For instance, artwork is stressed, while math, science, and athletics are ignored...

The children themselves are given just a little information, doled out very gradually--they are "told, but not told" what their fate in life will be.

Gradually, a couple of these "students" find out the answers to the riddles, as not many do. It is serious and sad, and told in Kathy's rather detached tone, which challenges the reader …

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Subjects

  • Women -- Fiction
  • Cloning -- Fiction
  • Organ donors -- Fiction
  • Donation of organs, tissues, etc. -- Fiction
  • England -- Fiction

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