Pet

(Pet #1)

Hardcover, 204 pages

English language

Published Feb. 3, 2019 by Make Me A World.

ISBN:
9780525647072

View on OpenLibrary

4 stars (13 reviews)

The highly-anticipated, genre-defying new novel by award-winning author Akwaeke Emezi that explores themes of identity and justice. Pet is here to hunt a monster. Are you brave enough to look?

There are no monsters anymore, or so the children in the city of Lucille are taught. Jam and her best friend, Redemption, have grown up with this lesson all their life. But when Jam meets Pet, a creature made of horns and colors and claws, who emerges from one of her mother's paintings and a drop of Jam's blood, she must reconsider what she's been told. Pet has come to hunt a monster, and the shadow of something grim lurks in Redemption's house. Jam must fight not only to protect her best friend, but also to uncover the truth, and the answer to the question*--How do you save the world from monsters if no one will admit they exist?

Acclaimed …

6 editions

A category-defying Title

5 stars

Content warning CW: Abuse, violence

Review of 'Pet' on 'Storygraph'

5 stars

PET is about abuse and the shape of justice, because removing monsters requires vigilance. The MC has space to make the wrong decision sometimes and then figure out the aftermath without failure being catastrophic. She has a very strong sense of herself which helps ground the story as she's trying to figure out how to deal with the disturbing disruption to her life which is the main plot. The plot is about child abuse and how a community deals with abusers and enablers, but the text itself keeps most descriptions vague except for a few places where it's very important to be clear about what's going on. I like the way the "no monsters" setup is subverted and examined without making the narrator into a liar. Overall this is a short and cathartic book about communication and justice, with a vibrant MC and really great characterization of secondary and minor …

Review of 'Pet' on 'Storygraph'

5 stars

The characters in PET are wonderfully diverse without their diversity being a plot point. And Jam and Redemption's friendship is the most loving, beautifully written friendship I've read to date.

The town of Lucille is essentially a utopia. Its older citizens have done some hard, difficult work. Justice is restorative, not punitive. There's a deep sense of community, of caring for each other as if they're all family, of getting to the root of problems and working them out. The community emphasizes free access to knowledge and the importance of public spaces like libraries. But Lucille is also a reminder that when we think we've figured things out, we must stay vigilant; complacency makes us unable and/or unwilling to acknowledge that injustices continue to occur.

With its powerful storyline and its emotional final scenes, PET addresses the cynicism that can creep in and exhaust people who care about social justice, …

Review of 'Pet' on 'Goodreads'

3 stars

This is a great manifestation of the discussions I've observed regarding representation in modern YA. To clarify on my rating, I think it's a great book that every young person should have the opportunity to finish. From the perspective of a privileged adult, it's two stars short of a masterpiece in part because it's clear Emezi wrote this in a crunch and as something of an experiment. I respect their motivations for doing so and what they accomplished, but a more polished version of this story would have involved less a less simplistic resolution to the mystery and a more challenging exploration of the "blind spots" in Lucille. But Jam as a protagonist is a revelation and this definitely motivates me to seek out Freshwater.

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