House of Leaves

709 pages

English language

Published May 4, 2000 by Pantheon Books.

ISBN:
978-0-375-70376-8
Copied ISBN!

View on Inventaire

4 stars (50 reviews)

Years ago, when House of Leaves was first being passed around, it was nothing more than a badly bundled heap of paper, parts of which would occasionally surface on the Internet. No one could have anticipated the small but devoted following this terrifying story would soon command. Starting with an odd assortment of marginalized youth—musicians, tattoo artists, programmers, strippers, environmentalists, and adrenaline junkies—the book eventually made its way into the hands of older generations, who not only found themselves in those strangely arranged pages but also discovered a way back into the lives of their estranged children.

Now, for the first time, this astonishing novel is made available in book form, complete with the original colored words, vertical footnotes, and newly added second and third appendices.

The story remains unchanged, focusing on a young family that moves into a small home on Ash Tree Lane where they discover something is …

1 edition

A Fantastic Fever Dream

5 stars

Whenever anyone asks me for a recommendation on a book, I give them House of Leaves. As a fan of experimental novels, nervous tension, lingering dread, beautiful and sometimes baffling prose, and reading as a physical experience, this book ticks all my boxes.

I seldom read a book more than once, but I’ve read House of Leaves several times. It’s constructed and printed such that it’s like reading a different book every time. Not a different story, but a different telling of the same story. Reading it the second time was a bit like overhearing the same conversation from the other side of the room, if that makes any sense.

It’s a great book. It’s inventive, challenging, and beautifully terrifying. In movies, they talk about elevated horror. This is an elevated haunted house book in all the right ways.

Review of 'House of Leaves' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

When I started House of Leaves--three weeks ago--expecting a horror story, and to be sure, there are scary parts, but the central plot is really a love story. There's also some mystery, history, mythology, and philosophy...but let me back up:

A family moves into a house which contains a hallway that is too big to fit into the house. Will Navidson, a Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist, and his partner, former model Karen Green, have moved to this house in a rural Virginia town with their two children to be together and work on their relationship. Unfortunately, the house comes between them, for awhile...

Navidson becomes obsessed with exploring, photographing, and filming the house, and enlists other professionals to help him. What follows would make a good horror flick. Meanwhile, the claustrophobic Karen wants nothing more than to pack up everything and get them all out of there.

The tale …

Review of 'House of Leaves' on 'Goodreads'

No rating

It's an homage to [a:Borges|500|Jorge Luis Borges|https://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1389336941p2/500.jpg]! And quite well done, too (at least up to p.50). I'd love to continue reading it but only with the attention and time that it deserves... and I have none of either right now. So, time to create a new bookshelf: deferred. Like to-read but for a future day with fewer time constraints.

Review of 'House of Leaves' on 'Goodreads'

2 stars

Johnny Truant searches an apartment for his friend and finds an academic study of a documentary film called The Navidson Record. This film investigates the phenomenon of the Navidson’s house where the house is larger inside than the outside. Initially it’s less than an inch difference but it keeps growing. The only problem with all of this is there is no evidence of this documentary ever existing. The book House of Leaves is that academic study (with all the footnotes) mixed with Johnny’s interjections, transcripts from the documentary and anything else.

This debut novel of Mark Z. Danielewski tries to mix a horror novel with some romance and satire but it mainly focuses on just how unreliable a narrator can be. I’ll be honest with you; I struggled to work out if I should review this as a piece of literature or as art, so I’ve done both and you …

Review of 'House of Leaves' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

The literary equivalent of a 'found footage' horror film (like The Blair Witch project or Cannibal Holocaust), House of Leaves is spooky and inventive and probably my favourite book I've read all year. Its experiments in formalism are clever and complement the story perfectly, helping you engage with the story in a unique way.

I can't recommend it enough. Just terrific.

avatar for Tomat0

rated it

4 stars
avatar for Libbum

rated it

5 stars
avatar for mttktz

rated it

5 stars
avatar for Neorxenawang

rated it

5 stars
avatar for sdivyank

rated it

5 stars
avatar for unsquare

rated it

5 stars
avatar for jumpinggrendel

rated it

4 stars
avatar for spodonkidonk

rated it

5 stars
avatar for cristopher

rated it

4 stars
avatar for Cor

rated it

5 stars
avatar for Adem

rated it

5 stars
avatar for Mack

rated it

5 stars
avatar for V171

rated it

5 stars
avatar for Jorn

rated it

5 stars
avatar for VerlanPerson

rated it

2 stars
avatar for loftypancake

rated it

5 stars
avatar for StereoSoda

rated it

2 stars
avatar for grahams

rated it

4 stars
avatar for pneumoREADS

rated it

5 stars
avatar for fluxmind

rated it

5 stars
avatar for Batsandbyrds

rated it

5 stars
avatar for dr_semla

rated it

4 stars
avatar for caltf4

rated it

5 stars
avatar for allenspark

rated it

5 stars
avatar for dnoate

rated it

5 stars
avatar for biblio_creep

rated it

3 stars
avatar for cryiscariot

rated it

5 stars
avatar for Ixion

rated it

5 stars