A thousand splendid suns

Hardcover, 630 pages

English language

Published Jan. 11, 2007 by Riverhead Books.

OCLC Number:
156976176

View on OpenLibrary

4 stars (37 reviews)

In his brilliant debut, The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini mesmerized us with his evocative portraits and beautiful bittersweet story. Now he returns to tumultuous Afghanistan to tell the tale of an unlikely friendship and an indestructible love...

The child of an illicit affair, Mariam was raised by her single mother on the outskirts of town. At 14, she was sent to Kabul and sold in marriage to Rasheed, a widower decades older than she. But now after twenty years and no offspring, Rasheed takes a beautiful teenager, Laila, as his second wife. While Mariam despises Laila and the baby born months after her arrival, Rasheed's cruelty and the explosive changes in the country soon draw the women together. --front flap

44 editions

Review of 'A Thousand Splendid Suns. Khaled Hosseini' on 'Goodreads'

1 star

I read this for a book club for July 2021. This was my first time reading Khaled Hosseini after years and years—I had previously read The Kite Runner when I was probably in high school or so, and I remembered enjoying that one a great deal. Coming to this book with the perspective of an adult who knows better and has seen more things, this book did not live up to my expectations.

Hosseini said in an interview that his aim was to represent the female perspective of war-torn Afghanistan through several periods of war and occupation of the country. However, I don’t feel that he has succeeded all that much in this. Yes, we do have a narrative centered on female characters, but they are mostly stagnant until the ending and devoid of personality other than the male characters that define them. I did not find this particularly empowering …

Review of 'A Thousand Splendid Suns' on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

This was one of the best books that I've ever read. A friend recommended it to me during my exams. Just for the sake of checking it out, I started reading it but as soon as I completed first few pages, I was hooked. Then in the next three days, amidst all the papers, I read it from cover-to-cover.

Review of 'A Thousand Splendid Suns' on 'Storygraph'

4 stars

A Thousand Splendid Suns is set in the near history of Afghanistan. The story covers the lives of Mariam and Laila, two girls with very different childhoods whose lives intersect. This story is about sadness, grief, war, and struggle, but also about keeping hope and faith. I wanted things to get better for Mariam and Laila, and was relieved when hope came through. For pain and suffering cannot last so long that peace and happiness are forgotten, and darkness cannot outlast the light.

Review of 'A Thousand Splendid Suns' on 'Goodreads'

3 stars

It's been a while since I haven't bothered to finish a book. Not sure what it was about this one - maybe too similar to The Kite Runner in terms of mood, so I just wasn't captivated by the storytelling. Would generally recommend it to others, though - just not particularly thought-provoking (in the first 136 pages, at least).

Review of 'A Thousand Splendid Suns' on 'Goodreads'

5 stars

Khaled Hosseini has the innate ability to send the taste of bile through your throat in an instant, depict gory acts without actually being vivid, make your heart flutter with joy and despair at will - while you still keep that small flame of hope that there is light at the end of the tunnel - and a very bright one at that. But most of all, he makes you wonder about the fate of Afghanistan and Afghanis, making you ask: 'What if?'.

Enchanting narrative. A carefully woven work laced with Farsi culture, literature and rituals in the backdrop of a troubled country. A vivid description of the wars through the experiences of the characters - even the meanest of them all.

Love. Honour. Survival. Desperation. But most of all, Hope. That is what this book is about - to me at least.

Review of 'A Thousand Splendid Suns' on 'Goodreads'

2 stars

I picked this up from the library because everyone seems to be reading books by Mr. Hosseini. I was disappointed. There is nothing innovative about his writing, and the only thing that seems to be interesting to anyone about reading this story is that it takes place in Afghanistan. I didn't feel invested in his characters at all. They are models for Mr. Hosseini to attempt to elicit compassion and understanding in Western audiences for Afghani women--which is great, that is very noble. But they don't seem to live and breathe on their own, apart from his grand purpose. They are tragic figures that life wreaks terror after terror upon. The small empowerment that they are able to discover at the end of the novel is muted, and if anything, defeats the purpose of eliciting understanding of Afghani cultural differences from a Western audience. What, murder, or a fantasy lover?

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Subjects

  • Large type books
  • Families
  • Fiction