The Windup Girl

Hardcover, 361 pages

Published Jan. 8, 2009 by Nightshade Books.

ISBN:
9781597801577
OCLC Number:
373482688

View on OpenLibrary

3 stars (21 reviews)

What Happens when bio-terrorism becomes a tool for corporate profits? And what happens when said bio-terrorism forces humanity to the cusp of post-human evolution? In The Windup Girl, award-winning author Paolo Bacigalupi returns to the world of "The Calorie Man"( Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award-winner, Hugo Award nominee, 2006) and "Yellow Card Man" (Hugo Award nominee, 2007) in order to address these questions.

13 editions

Review of 'The Windup Girl' on 'Goodreads'

3 stars

Full disclosure: I think I pulled the trigger on this purchase a long time ago after someone suggested Murakami's Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. It might have been a dumb mistake, but I wasn't going to let it go to waste.



And then, it wasn't really a dumb mistake because it wasn't a bad book.



Bacigalupi (owner of an awesome last name) elegantly presents a full multidimensional dystopic vision. Rather than resorting to a horrible preface to set the scene, the setting of the novel is presented gradually over the first third of the story through the memories and conversations of characters. It's subtly accomplished and satisfying and realistic.



The author also sets a nice pace with plenty of action, plenty of scheming, logical motivations and structures for the plot. It moves quickly and never seems fantastic. My willingness to believe was never strained.



Where The Windup Girl misses, however, is a …

Review of 'The Windup Girl' on 'Goodreads'

4 stars

I first heard about Paolo Bacigalupi when Pump Six was released on StarShipSofa. I was immediately taken by the attention to detail and superbly gritty realism of the story. The Windup Girl plays to these same strengths on a much larger scale.



Set in Thailand, in a world where the oil has finally run out, the story is thoughtful, thought-provoking and utterly gripping. Although the novel has a very strong cyberpunk feel (no bad thing, in my view) it is a very different story. The best description I can come up with is 'environmental dystopia', but this woefully undersells just how rich the narrative and the world is.



If you like SF that makes you think without feeling the need to preach at you, you really should read this.

Review of 'The Windup Girl' on 'Storygraph'

1 star

Ah, this book... I feel like this was last year's "really important book that you need to read but may not like much". It hit really hard in the almost presciently relevant to our times area, but not so hard in the keeping me excited section. Partly, it was the fact that I had so much trouble engaging with the #1 protagonist... I have a limited amount of patience for asshole protagonists, and he wore it out right at the start. Partly, too, I was really unprepared for some of the really graphic sexual violence that occurs pretty close to the opening of the book. I know it's meant to drive home just how abused and discarded that character is, but it's so abrupt and feels gratuitously detailed. Maybe, thinking back, it was necessary... so just let this review stand as a trigger warning to others who might be sensitive.I …

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Subjects

  • Bio-terrorism, gene-hacking, steampunk, AI

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