Guns, Germs, and Steel

The Fates of Human Societies

Hardcover, 480 pages

English language

Published March 25, 1997 by W.W. Norton & Co..

ISBN:
9780393038910

View on OpenLibrary

4 stars (27 reviews)

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies (previously titled Guns, Germs and Steel: A Short History of Everybody for the Last 13,000 Years) is a 1997 transdisciplinary non-fiction book by Jared Diamond. In 1998, Guns, Germs, and Steel won the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction and the Aventis Prize for Best Science Book. A documentary based on the book, and produced by the National Geographic Society, was broadcast on PBS in July 2005.The book attempts to explain why Eurasian and North African civilizations have survived and conquered others, while arguing against the idea that Eurasian hegemony is due to any form of Eurasian intellectual, moral, or inherent genetic superiority. Diamond argues that the gaps in power and technology between human societies originate primarily in environmental differences, which are amplified by various positive feedback loops. When cultural or genetic differences have favored Eurasians (for example, written language or the โ€ฆ

30 editions

Review of 'Guns, germs, and steel' on Goodreads

4 stars

1) ''The most dramatic moment in subsequent European-North American relations was the first encounter between the Inca emperor Atahuallpa and the Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro at the Peruvian highland town of Cajamarca on November 16, 1532. Atahuallpa was absolute monarch of the largest and most advanced state in the New World, while Pizarro represented the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V (also known as King Charles I of Spain), monarch of the most powerful state in Europe. Pizarro, leading a ragtag group of 168 Spanish soldiers, was in unfamiliar terrain, ignorant of the local inhabitants, completely out of touch with the nearest Spaniards (1,000 miles to the north in Panama) and far beyond the reach of timely reinforcements. Atahuallpa was in the middle of his own empire of millions of subjects and immediately surrounded by his army of 80,000 soldiers, recently victorious in a war with other Indians. Nevertheless, Pizarro captured โ€ฆ

avatar for ghostmodernist

rated it

3 stars
avatar for ajft

rated it

4 stars
avatar for Libbum

rated it

5 stars
avatar for idlesong

rated it

4 stars
avatar for chrisaldrich

rated it

5 stars
avatar for lucasrizoli

rated it

3 stars
avatar for aandnota

rated it

4 stars
avatar for sajith

rated it

4 stars
avatar for deckard

rated it

4 stars
avatar for secretGeek

rated it

5 stars
avatar for cubeofwood

rated it

4 stars
avatar for asmundg

rated it

4 stars
avatar for pearsonbolt

rated it

3 stars
avatar for Vincent

rated it

5 stars
avatar for Passionate_Reader

rated it

5 stars
avatar for kirkmoodey

rated it

4 stars
avatar for alanz

rated it

4 stars
avatar for Fuxino

rated it

4 stars
avatar for cristianopala

rated it

5 stars
avatar for idlesong

rated it

4 stars

Subjects

  • Social evolution
  • Civilization -- History
  • Ethnology
  • Human beings -- Effect of environment on
  • Culture diffusion